Academy Award for Best Picture

Knowledge Identifier: $Academy_Award_for_Best_Picture

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Academy Award for Best Picture

One of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually since the awards inception in 1929, by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to producers working in the film industry and is the only category in which every member is eligible to submit a nomination add

Category: Movies & TV (100)

Launched in 1950.

Countries: United States (71%), United Kingdom (9%), (8%)

Main connections: Academy Awards, Academy Award for Best Actress, Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Linked to: Allied Artists Pictures Corporation, American Broadcasting Company, The Ox-Bow Incident, The Weinstein Company

 

Timeline


 

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Originally the production company was presented the award until 1950 whereupon all credited producers were able to receive the award add something

 

Until 1950, the Best Picture award was given to the production company; from 1951 on, it has gone to the producer or producers add something


1951

Nina Foch - In 1951, she appeared with Gene Kelly in the musical "An American in Paris", which was *awarded the Best Picture Oscar


1953

Delbert Mann - It was the first Best Picture winner to be based on a television program, being adapted from a 1953 teleplay of the same name which he had directed


1954

Buddy Adler - In 1954, his production of "From Here to Eternity" won the Academy Award for Best Picture and in 1956, his "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing" was nominated for best picture


1957

William Goetz - After leaving Universal, Goetz became an independent producer, making films such as 1957's "Sayonara", which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture


1965

Robert Wise - He won the Academy *award for Best Director and Best Picture again in 1965 with "The Sound of Music"


1967

In the Heat of the Night (film) - The film won five Academy *awards, including the 1967 *award for Best Picture

 

United Artists - UA released another Best Picture Oscar winner in 1967, "In the Heat of the Night", starring Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger, and a nominee for Best Picture, "The Graduate", an Embassy production that UA distributed overseas


1971

Thomas Langmann - "'Thomas Langmann"' is a French film producer and actor, known for producing "The Artist" , for which he received an Academy Award for Best Picture as producer in 2012


1972

Diane Keaton - "The Godfather" was an unparalleled critical and financial success, becoming the highest grossing film of the year and winning the Best Picture Oscar of 1972


1974

The Conversation - It was nominated for three Academy *awards in 1974 and lost Best Picture to "The Godfather Part II", another Francis Ford Coppola film


1976

Irwin Winkler - In 1976, he won an Oscar for Best Picture for "Rocky"


1977

Woody Allen - Allen's film Annie Hall won four Academy Awards in 1977, including Best Picture.

 

Annie Hall - Along with the 1977 Academy *award for Best Picture, "Annie Hall" won Oscars in three other categories: two for Allen , and Keaton for $Best_Actress (BAFTA_Award_for_Best_Actress_in_a_Leading_Role)

 

Woody Allen - Annie Hall won four Academy Awards in 1977, including Best Picture and Best Actress in a Leading Role for Diane Keaton.

 

Charles H. Joffe - Joffe won the 1977 Academy Award for Best Picture as producer of Allen's "Annie Hall"

 

Jack Rollins (producer) - The Woody Allen film "Annie Hall" was listed as "A Jack Rollins and Charles H. Joffe Production", though only Joffe took producer credit and received the 1977 Academy Award for Best Picture


1978

Barry Spikings - For the 1978 film, "The Deer Hunter", Spikings won an Academy Award for Best Picture

 

United Artists - The new leadership of UA agreed to back "Heaven's Gate", the pet project of director Michael Cimino, who had won Academy *awards for Best Picture and Best Director for his 1978 film "The Deer Hunter"


1979

Kramer vs. Kramer - It received five Academy *awards in 1979 in the categories of Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, and Best Adapted Screenplay


1980

Kramer vs. Kramer - It received five Academy *awards in 1980 in the categories of Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Actor, and Best Supporting Actress

 

Ordinary People - The film won Best Picture for 1980


1981

Coen Brothers - Warren Beatty tied Welles' record when Beatty was nominated for Best Picture, Director, Actor, and Screenplay for Reds in 1981.

 

Steven Spielberg - It became the biggest film at the box office in 1981, and the recipient of numerous Oscar nominations including Best Director (Spielberg's second nomination) and Best Picture (the second Spielberg film to be nominated for Best Picture).

 

Silver Linings Playbook - It received eight Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay; it became the first film since 1981 to be Oscar-nominated for the four acting categories and the first since 2004 to be nominated for the Big Five Oscars, with Lawrence winning the Academy Award for Best Actress


1982

Richard Attenborough - He won the 1982 Academy *award for Best Director and as the film's producer, the Academy *award for Best Picture for his historical epic, "Gandhi" and another Golden Globe, this time as Best Director, for the same film in 1983, a project he had been attempting to get made for 18 years

 

Raiders of the Lost Ark - It was nominated for nine Academy Awards in 1982, including Best Picture, and won four and a fifth Special Achievement Award for its Sound Effects Editing

 

The English Patient (film) - "The English Patient" is one of only three Best Picture winners to never enter the weekend box office top 5 since top 10 rankings were first recorded in 1982


1983

Terms of Endearment - Gene Siskel, who gave the film a highly enthusiastic review, correctly predicted upon its release that it would go on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1983


1986

Platoon (film) - The film won the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1986


1989

My Left Foot (film) - It won the NYFCC Best Picture Award for 1989

 

Dead Poets Society - Peter Weir received a nomination for Best Director and the film itself was nominated for Best Picture of 1989


1990

Dead Poets Society - On their Oscar Nomination edition of "Siskel & Ebert", both Gene Siskel and Ebert disagreed with Williams' Oscar nomination, with Ebert saying that he would have swapped Williams with either Matt Dillon for "Drugstore Cowboy" or John Cusack for "Say Anything", and on their "If We Picked the Winners" special in March of 1990, Ebert chose the film's Best Picture nomination as the worst nomination of the year, believing it took a slot that could have have gone to Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing"


1991

Warren Beatty - In 1991, he produced and starred as the real-life gangster Bugsy Siegel in the critically and commercially acclaimed "Bugsy", directed by Barry Levinson, which was nominated for 10 Academy *awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor

 

Academy Award for Best Animated Feature - In fact, prior to the creation of the *award, only one animated film received a Best Picture nomination: 1991's "Beauty and the Beast," by Walt Disney Pictures


1993

Howards End (film) - In 1993, the film received nine Academy *award nominations, including Best Picture for Ismail Merchant and Best Director for James Ivory


1994

Heavenly Creatures - Nick Hyman, writing for Metacritic, thought that 1994's Oscar-winning "Forrest Gump" was equally matched by "Memorable Film Not Nominated for Best Picture", including "Heavenly Creatures", of which Hyman said, "Peter Jackson's masterful blend of fantastical visions and a heartbreaking real-life murder tragedy has arguably never been topped

 

Different Seasons - The collection is notable for having had three of its four novellas turned into Hollywood films, one of which, "The Shawshank Redemption", was nominated for the 1994 Academy Award for Best Picture

 

Michael Pena - Though Peña has been a regular in independent productions since 1994, his breakthrough performances came in 2004 in two Best Picture Oscar-winning Paul Haggis penned films, "Million Dollar Baby" and "Crash"


1996

Eric Fellner - "Dead Man Walking" and "Fargo" won Oscars in 1996 and 1997 respectively, while "Elizabeth" and "Atonement" were both nominated for the Best Picture Academy *award


1998

The Academy used the producer credits of the Producers Guild of America until 1998, when all five producers of "Shakespeare in Love" made speeches after its win add something

 

This rule was modified in 1998, when a three-producer limit was applied due to all five producers of "Shakespeare in Love" receiving the award add something

 

Marc Norman - With Tom Stoppard, he won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay in the 71st Academy Awards of 1998, for his script of "Shakespeare in Love"; he shared in the Best Picture Oscar for the film as co-producer


1999

Bruce Cohen - Cohen and Jinks produced "American Beauty", winner of the 1999 Academy Award for Best Picture


2000

Ryan Phillippe - In the 2000s, he appeared in several films, including 2001's Academy *award Best Picture nominee "Gosford Park", 2005's Academy *award-winning ensemble film "Crash", and the 2006 war drama "Flags of Our Fathers"

 

There Will Be Blood - The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards including Best Picture, winning Best Actor for Day-Lewis and Best Cinematography for Robert Elswit, and is regarded as one of the best movies of the 2000s

 

American Beauty (film) - On March 26, 2000, "American Beauty" won five Academy *awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor , Best Original Screenplay and Best Cinematography


2001

John Forbes Nash - A film by the same name was released in 2001, directed by Ron Howard with Russell Crowe playing Nash; it won four Academy *awards, including Best Picture

 

Akiva Goldsman - He received an Academy *award for Best Adapted Screenplay for the 2001 film, "A Beautiful Mind", which won the Oscar for Best Picture

 

Marisa Tomei - In 2001, Tomei appeared in Todd Field's Best Picture nominee "In the Bedroom" opposite Sissy Spacek and Tom Wilkinson, earning several *awards including a ShoWest *award for Best Supporting Actress in 2002


 

The Grand Staircase columns at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, where the Academy Awards ceremonies have been held since 2002, showcase every film that has won the Best Picture title since the award's inception add something

 

A Beautiful Mind (film) - In 2002, the film was *awarded four Academy *awards, for Best Adapted Screenplay , Best Picture , Best Director and Best Supporting Actress


2003

Sofia Coppola - Coppola was nominated for three Academy *awards for her 2003 film "Lost in Translation", in the categories of Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay

 

Chicago (2002 film) - Directed and choreographed by Rob Marshall, and adapted by screenwriter Bill Condon, "Chicago" won six Academy *awards in 2003, including Best Picture

 

Martin Scorsese - In February 2003, Gangs of New York received ten Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor for Daniel Day-Lewis, however it did not win in any category.


2004

Finding Neverland - The film was nominated for several Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Actor for Johnny Depp's portrayal of J. M. Barrie, and won the 2004 Academy *award for Jan A. P. Kaczmarek's musical score

 

Million Dollar Baby - "Million Dollar Baby" received the *award for Best Picture of 2004 at the 77th Academy *awards

 

Miranda Otto - "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy was a critical and financial success, and the third film won the Academy *award for Best Picture in 2004


 

This is the year before the ceremony at which the award is given; for example, a film exhibited theatrically during 2005 was eligible for consideration for the 2005 Best Picture Oscar, awarded in 2006 add something

 

Braveheart - In a 2005 poll by British film magazine "Empire", "Braveheart" was No. 1 on their list of "The Top 10 Worst Pictures to Win Best Picture Oscar"

 

Martin Scorsese - In January 2005, The Aviator became the most-nominated film of the 77th Academy Awards nominations, nominated in 11 categories including Best Picture.


2006

Graham King - He is best known for his Academy Award winning 2006 crime thriller film "The Departed", which was awarded the Best Picture Oscar at the 79th Academy Awards

 

Crash (2004 film) - In 2006, the film received six Academy *award nominations and won three for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Film Editing at the 78th Academy *awards

 

The Departed - It marked the first time that an Oscar-winning Best Picture was released to the home video market in DVD format only, as VHS was totally phased out by the start of 2006

 

Dreamgirls (film) - The resulting positive buzz earned "Dreamgirls" the status of "front-runner" for the 2006 Academy *award for Best Picture and several of the other Oscars as well

 

Crash (2004 film) - It was the first Best Picture winner to be released on Blu-ray Disc in the United States, on June 27, 2006

 

Toni Collette - Released in July 2006, the film received major critical acclaim, resulting into several accolades such as four Academy *award nominations, including Best Picture, whilst Collette herself earned her second BAFTA and Golden Globe nominations for her portrayal of the family's worn-out matriarch

 

Letters from Iwo Jima - On December 10, 2006, the Los Angeles Film Critics Association named "Letters from Iwo Jima" Best Picture of 2006


2007

Dreamgirls (film) - For the 2007 Golden Globe *awards, "Dreamgirls" was nominated in five categories: Best Picture - Comedy or Musical, Best Actress in a Comedy or Musical , Best Supporting Actor , Best Supporting Actress , and Best Original Song

 

Dreamgirls (film) - Furthermore, "Dreamgirls" was nominated for eleven 2007 International Press Academy Satellite *awards, and won four of the *awards: Best Picture - Comedy or Musical, Best Director , Best Actress in a Supporting Role , and Best Sound

 

Christine Langan - In 2007, it won the BAFTA *award for Best Film and was nominated for the Academy *award for Best Picture

 

Dreamgirls (film) - "Dreamgirls" received eight 2007 Academy *award nominations covering six categories, the most of any film for the year, although it was not nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, or either of the lead acting categories

 

The Departed - At the 79th Academy *awards on February 25, 2007, "The Departed" won four Academy *awards for Best Picture , Best Director , Best Film Editing , and Best Adapted Screenplay


2008

Anthony McCarten - McCarten has already directed the big screen adaptation and the movie had its world premiere at the Montreal World Film Festival, 2008, and was nominated for Best Picture and Best Director at the New Zealand Film *awards

 

Precious (film) - S. James Snyder, of "Time", compared "Precious's" success at Sundance to that of 2008's "The Wrestler" and "Slumdog Millionaire"; both films later were nominated for multiple Academy *awards, and "Slumdog" itself won Best Picture at the 81st Annual Academy *awards

 

Juno (film) - The film received four 2008 Academy Awards nominations: Best Original Screenplay, which Diablo Cody won, Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actress for Ellen Page

 

Academy Award for Best Animated Feature - This criticism was particularly prominent at the 81st Academy Awards, in which "WALL-E" won the *award but was not nominated for Best Picture, despite receiving overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics and moviegoers and being generally considered one of the best films of 2008


2009

This number remained until 2009, when the limit was raised to ten and later adjusted in 2011, to vary between five and ten add something

 

Oscar - For example, the 2009 Best Picture winner, "The Hurt Locker", was actually first released in 2008, but did not qualify for the 2008 *awards as it did not play its Oscar-qualifying run in Los Angeles until mid-2009, thus qualifying for the 2009 *awards

 

Academy Awards - For example, the 2009 Best Picture winner, "The Hurt Locker", was actually first released in 2008, but did not qualify for the 2008 *awards as it did not play its Oscar-qualifying run in Los Angeles until mid-2009, thus qualifying for the 2009 *awards

 

Mark Boal - In 2009, he wrote and produced "The Hurt Locker", for which he won both the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and the Academy Award for Best Picture

 

Quentin Tarantino - In 2009, his film Inglourious Basterds was nominated for eight Oscars including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay, winning one for Best Supporting Actor.

 

Academy Award for Best Animated Feature - In 2009, when the nominee slots for Best Picture were doubled to ten, "Up" was nominated for both Best Animated Feature and Best Picture at the 82nd Academy Awards, the first film to do so since the creation of the Animated Feature category

 

Slumdog Millionaire - In addition, it was nominated for 10 Academy Awards in 2009, winning eight, the most for any film of 2008, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay

 

Slumdog Millionaire - On 22 February 2009, the film won eight out of ten Academy Awards for which it was nominated, including the Best Picture and Best Director

 

On June 24, 2009, AMPAS announced that the number of films nominated in the Best Picture award category would increase from five to ten, starting with the 82nd Academy Awards add something


2010

Academy Awards - For example, a producer of the 2010 Best Picture nominee, "The Hurt Locker," was disqualified as a producer in the category when he contacted associates urging them to vote for his film and not another that was seen as front-runner

 

Darren Aronofsky - In 2010 Aronofsky was an executive producer on "The Fighter" and his fifth feature film, "Black Swan", received further critical acclaim and many accolades, being nominated for five Academy *awards including Best Picture and Best Director

 

Beauty and the Beast (1991 film) - It was the first animated film ever to be nominated for Best Picture, and remained the only animated film nominated until 2010, when the Best Picture field was widened to ten nominees, and it's the only animated film nominated for the *award when it had five nominees

 

Inglourious Basterds - In February 2010, the film was nominated for eight Academy *awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor for Waltz, and Best Original Screenplay

 

Precious (film) - On February 2, 2010, the film received Academy *award nominations at the 82nd Academy *awards, for Best Picture, Best Actress , Best Supporting Actress , Best Director , Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film Editing


2011

Aron Ralston - At the 83rd Academy *awards in 2011 the film was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Franco

 

The Blind Side (film) - In 2011 the Academy changed the policy: stating the Best Picture category would feature between five and ten nominees depending on voting results, as opposed to a set number of nominees

 

Winter's Bone - It received four 2011 Academy *award nominations: Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor

 

Darren Aronofsky - On January 25, 2011, the film was nominated for a total of five Academy *awards; Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Cinematography and Best Film Editing and in March, Portman won as Best Actress

 

Lionel Logue - In February 2011, "The King's Speech" won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Colin Firth


2012

Veit Heiduschka - He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture for "Amour" along with Margaret Menegoz, Stefan Arndt and Michael Katz in 2013

 

Midnight in Paris - In 2012, the film won both the Academy *award for Best Original Screenplay and the Golden Globe *awards for Best Screenplay; and was nominated for three other Academy *awards: Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Art Direction

 

Benedict Cumberbatch - The film received five BAFTA nominations and six Academy *award nominations, including the Best Picture nomination in 2012

 

The Tree of Life (film) - In January 2012, the film was nominated for three Academy *awards: Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Cinematography

 

The Help (film) - In February 2012, the film received four Academy Award nominations including Best Picture, Best Actress for Davis, Best Supporting Actress for Chastain, and a win for Best Supporting Actress for Spencer


2013

George Clooney - In 2013, Clooney won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture - Drama, the BAFTA *award for Best Picture and the Academy *award for Best Picture for producing the film "Argo"

 

George Clooney - In 2013, he received the Academy *award for Best Picture for producing the film "Argo", alongside Ben Affleck and Grant Heslov

 

Ang Lee - In January 2013, "Life of Pi" earned 11 Academy *award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Visual Effects; only one fewer than Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln"


2014

Solomon Northup - The latter won an Academy Award in 2014 for Best Picture

 

According to a Reuters/Ipsos poll in February 2014, two-thirds of Americans had yet to see any of the movies nominated for the 2013 best picture Oscar add something

 

Steve McQueen (director) - The film won the Academy *award for Best Picture in March 2014, becoming the first Best Picture winner to have a black director or producer


2015

Anthony McCarten - On January 15, 2015 the film received 5 Academy *award nominations, with McCarten earning two as producer and screenwriter in the categories of Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay


2016

As of 2016, there have been 528 films nominated for Best Picture add something


2017

As of 2017, there have been 537 films nominated for Best Picture add something


2018

The most recent to have been nominated was "Get Out" in 2018, and the only horror film to win was "The Silence of the Lambs", in 1991 add something