Christopher Marlowe

Knowledge Identifier: +Christopher_Marlowe

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Christopher Marlowe

English dramatist, poet and translator of the Elizabethan era add

Category: Literature

Born in 1564.

Countries: United Kingdom (69%), (13%), United States (6%)

Main connections: Love at first sight, Privy council, Tracy-Ann Oberman

Linked to: Oxford University Press, School of Night, The King's School, Canterbury, Privy Council

 

Timeline


 

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Christopher Marlowe was born in 1564 add something


1580

A warrant for Marlowe's arrest was issued on 18 May, when the Privy Council apparently knew that he might be found staying with Thomas Walsingham, whose father was a first cousin of the late Sir Francis Walsingham, Elizabeth's principal secretary in the 1580s and a man more deeply involved in state espionage than any other member of the Privy Council add something


1584

Marlowe attended The King's School in Canterbury and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, where he studied on a scholarship and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1584 add something


1587

Tamburlaine - Marlowe's first play performed on the regular stage in London, in 1587, was "Tamburlaine the Great", about the conqueror Timur, who rises from shepherd to warrior add something

 

As noted above, in 1587 the Privy Council ordered the University of Cambridge to award Marlowe his degree of Master of Arts, denying rumours that he intended to go to the English Catholic college in Rheims, saying instead that he had been engaged in unspecified "affaires" on "matters touching the benefit of his country" add something

 

In 1587 the university hesitated to award him his Master of Arts degree because of a rumour that he had converted to Roman Catholicism and intended to go to the English college at Rheims to prepare for the priesthood add something


1589

Frederick Boas dismisses the possibility of this identification, based on surviving legal records which not only document his presence in London from summer to the end of 1589, but as a party to a fatal quarrel involving his neighbours in Norton Folgate, and was imprisoned at Newgate Prison for a fortnight add something

 

It has sometimes been theorised that Marlowe was the "Morley" who was tutor to Arbella Stuart in 1589 add something


1590

Marlowe's plays were the foundation of the repertoire of Alleyn's company, the Admiral's Men, throughout the 1590s add something

 

The two parts of "Tamburlaine" were published in 1590; all Marlowe's other works were published posthumously add something

 

Elizabeth I of England - During the 1590s, some of the great names of English literature entered their maturity, including William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe


1592

In 1592 Marlowe was arrested in the town of Flushing in the Netherlands for his alleged involvement in the counterfeiting of coins, presumably related to the activities of seditious Catholics add something


1593

Following Marlowe's arrest in 1593, Baines submitted to the authorities a "note containing the opinion of one Christopher Marly concerning his damnable judgment of religion, and scorn of God's word add something


Christopher Marlowe died in 1593 add something

 

A warrant was issued for Marlowe's arrest on 18 May 1593 add something


1594

The play was first published in 1594; the title page attributes the play to Marlowe and Thomas Nashe add something


1598

In his "Palladis Tamia", published in 1598, Francis Meres says Marlowe was "stabbed to death by a bawdy serving-man, a rival of his in his lewd love" as punishment for his "epicurism and atheism add something

 

Love at first sight - William Shakespeare pays a handsome tribute to Christopher Marlowe, who himself wrote "Who ever loved that loved not at first sight-" in his 1598 poem "Hero and Leander", by citing him the next year in "As You Like It": 'Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might: "Who ever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight-"'

 

Love at first sight - William Shakespeare pays a handsome tribute to Christopher Marlowe, who himself wrote "Who ever loved that loved not at first sight-" in his 1598 poem "Hero and Leander", by citing him the next year in "As You Like It": 'Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might: "Who ever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight-"'


1599

In 1599, his translation of Ovid was banned and copies publicly burned as part of Archbishop Whitgift's crackdown on offensive material add something


1657

The play "Lust's Dominion" was attributed to Marlowe upon its initial publication in 1657, though scholars and critics have almost unanimously rejected the attribution add something


1917

In 1917, in the "Dictionary of National Biography", Sir Sidney Lee wrote that Marlowe was killed in a drunken fight, and this is still often stated as fact today add something


1937

This possibility was first raised in a "TLS" letter by E. St John Brooks in 1937; in a letter to "Notes and Queries", John Baker has added that only Marlowe could be Arbella's tutor due to the absence of any other known "Morley" from the period with an MA and not otherwise occupied add something


1964

Jerzy Grotowski - In 1964 Grotowski followed success with success when his theatre premiered "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus" based on the Elizabethan drama by Christopher Marlowe, featuring Zbigniew Cynkutis in the title role


1991

Edward II of England - In 1991 English filmmaker Derek Jarman adapted the Christopher Marlowe play into a film featuring Tilda Swinton, Steven Waddington, Andrew Tiernan, Nigel Terry, and Annie Lennox


1993

Tracy-Ann Oberman - In 1993 she took part in the RSC's *award-winning production of Christopher Marlowe's "Tamburlaine" as "Olympia"


2002

A memorial window to Marlowe was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 2002 add something


2004

New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2004: 268 add something

 


2011

In 2011 Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells wrote to "The Times" newspaper, calling on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence" and "denies history" add something

 

On 25 October 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by "The Times" newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence" add something


2012

In 2012 they renewed this call in their e-book "Shakespeare Bites Back", adding that it "denies history", and again the following year in their book "Shakespeare Beyond Doubt", add something


 

It was winner of the Desmond Elliott Prize and joint winner of the Authors' Club First Novel award for 2013 add something