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Connections

Massachusetts
(Animal)
Yale University
(Education)
Dan Malloy
(Politics)
Joe Lieberman
(Politics)
Gustave Whitehead
(Philosophy)
Raymond E. Baldwin
(Politics)
 

See also

Connecticut

Knowledge Identifier: $Connecticut

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Connecticut

Category:States of the United Statesadd

Category: Environment (330)

Launched in -5000.

Countries: United States (78%), (6%), United Kingdom (5%)

Main connections: Massachusetts, Yale University, Dan Malloy

Linked to: Colt's Manufacturing Company, Connecticut Green Party, Connecticut Republican Party, Democratic Party of Connecticut

 

Timeline


 

This timeline needs to be reviewed and corrected, as it has been automatically generated from multiple web sources.
Please help improve it by adding dated informations, images and videos about Connecticut.


1630

Half of Connecticut was initially part of the Dutch colony New Netherland, which included much of the land between the Connecticut and Delaware Rivers, although the first major settlements were established in the 1630s by the English add something


1633

The first English settlers came in 1633 and settled at Windsor, and at Wethersfield the following year add something


1635

John Winthrop the Younger of Massachusetts received a commission to create Saybrook Colony at the mouth of the Connecticut River in 1635 add something


1636

Settlers responded to a murder in 1636 with a raid on a Pequot village on Block Island; the Pequots laid siege to Saybrook Colony's garrison that autumn, raided Wethersfield in the spring of 1637 add something

 

The main body of settlers came in one large group in 1636 add something


1639

Connecticut had been governed under the "Fundamental Orders" since 1639, but the state adopted a new constitution in 1818 add something

 

From 1639 until the adoption of the 1818 constitution, the governor presided over the General Assembly add something

 

Thomas Hooker - On January 14, 1639, freemen from these three settlements ratified the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut" in what John Fiske called "the first written constitution known to history that created a government

 

The New Haven Colony had its own constitution called "The Fundamental Agreement of the New Haven Colony", signed on June 4, 1639 add something


1650

The Hartford Treaty with the Dutch was signed on September 19, 1650, but it was never ratified by the British add something


1652

" This agreement was observed by both sides until war erupted between England and The Netherlands in 1652 add something


1662

After the Fundamental Orders, Connecticut was granted governmental authority by King Charles II of England through the Connecticut Charter of 1662 add something

 

In 1662, Winthrop traveled to England and obtained a charter from Charles II which united the settlements of Connecticut add something

 

In 1662, the three colonies were merged under a royal charter, making Connecticut a crown colony add something


1664

Conflict continued concerning colonial limits until the Duke of York captured New Netherland in 1664 add something


1701

Yale College was established in 1701, providing Connecticut with an important institution to educate clergy and civil leaders add something


1725

Thomas Clap - He preached at Windham, Connecticut, in 1725 and was ordained to succeed the Rev. Samuel Whiting as minister there in 1726, marrying Rev. Whiting's daughter Mary in 1727, and remaining 14 years, with a ministry marked by a rather severe orthodoxy


1740

Israel Putnam - In 1740, at the age of 22, he moved west to Mortlake in northeastern Connecticut, where land was cheaper and easier for young men to buy


1743

Thomas Clap - Clap instituted Yale's library catalog in 1743, and drafted a new charter of the school, granted by the General Assembly in 1745, incorporating the institution as "The President and Fellows of Yale College in New Haven, Connecticut"


1745

Thomas Clap - His formulation of a new code of laws for Yale in Latin became, in 1745, the first book printed in New Haven, Connecticut


1746

Thomas Clap - In 1746, Clap expelled Samuel Cooke from the Yale Corporation for his role in setting up the separatist congregation in New Haven, Connecticut


1765

Israel Putnam - In the fall of 1765, Putnam threatened Thomas Fitch, the popularly elected Connecticut Governor, over this issue


1773

Connecticut was home to the nation's first law school, Litchfield Law School, which operated from 1773 to 1833 in Litchfield add something


1775

Connecticut's legislature authorized the outfitting of six new regiments in 1775, in the wake of the clashes between British regulars and Massachusetts militia at Lexington and Concord add something

 

There were some 1,200 Connecticut troops on hand at the Battle of Bunker Hill in June 1775 add something

 

Israel Putnam - Putnam joined the Continental Army when it was organized in July 1775, he was commissioned as colonel of the 3rd Connecticut Regiment, and later became brigadier of the Connecticut militia


1777

Continental Army troops and militia led by General David Wooster and General Benedict Arnold engaged them on their return march at Ridgefield in 1777 add something

 

In 1777, the British got word of Continental Army supplies in Danbury, and they landed an expeditionary force of some 2,000 troops in Westport add something

 

Timothy Dwight IV - Licensed to preach in 1777, he was appointed by Congress chaplain in General Samuel Holden Parsons's "Connecticut Continental Brigade"


1778

Israel Putnam - During the winter of 1778-1779, Putnam and his troops were encamped at the site now preserved as the Putnam Memorial State Park in Redding, Connecticut


1779

General William Tryon raided the Connecticut coast in July 1779, focusing on New Haven, Norwalk, and Fairfield add something


1781

New London and Groton Heights were raided in September 1781 by Benedict Arnold, who had turned traitor to the British add something


1783

Timothy Dwight IV - Declining calls from churches in Beverly, Massachusetts and Charlestown, he chose instead to settle from 1783 until 1795 as minister in "Greenfield Hill," a congregational church in Fairfield, Connecticut


1786

In 1786, Connecticut ceded territory to the U.S. government that became part of the Northwest Territory add something


1787

The origin of this nickname is uncertain, but it likely comes from Connecticut's pivotal role in the federal constitutional convention of 1787, during which Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth helped to orchestrate what became known as the Connecticut Compromise, or the Great Compromise add something


1788

Connecticut ratified the U.S. Constitution on January 9, 1788, becoming the fifth state add something


1790

Israel Putnam - Putnam died in Brooklyn, Connecticut in 1790, and was buried in an above-ground tomb in Brooklyn's South Cemetery


1793

Timothy Dwight IV - In 1793 Dwight preached a sermon to the General Association of Connecticut entitled a "Discourse on the Genuineness and Authenticity of the New Testament" which when printed the next year became an important tract defending the orthodox faith against Deists and other skeptics


1795

Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. - He did not seek re-election for a fourth term and instead ran for the United States Senate, where he was elected and served from March 4, 1795 to June 10, 1796, when he resigned to become Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut


1797

Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. - When the Governor died in December 1797, he became governor and was re-elected to eleven consecutive terms until his death in 1809 in Lebanon, Connecticut


1804

The origin of this anomaly is clearly established in a long line of disputes and temporary agreements which were finally concluded in 1804, when southern Southwick's residents sought to leave Massachusetts, and the town was split in half add something


1808

Benjamin Silliman - He lectured publicly at New Haven, Connecticut in 1808 and came to discover many of the constituent elements of many minerals


1809

Benjamin Silliman - His first marriage was on 17 September 1809 to Harriet Trumbull, Connecticut, daughter of Connecticut governor Jonathan_Trumbull, Connecticut,_Jr., who was the son of Governor Jonathan Trumbull, Connecticut, Sr. of Connecticut, a hero of the American Revolution


1812

War of 1812 - The British blockade during the War of 1812 hurt exports and bolstered the influence of Federalists who opposed the war add something


1814

The failure of the Hartford Convention in 1814 hurt the Federalist cause, with the Democratic-Republican Party gaining control in 1817 add something


1816

Timothy Dwight IV - In 1816 he enrolled in the new Foreign Mission School, established by the American Board across from the Congregational Church in Cornwall, Connecticut


1817

Eli Whitney - His 1817 marriage to Henrietta Edwards, granddaughter of the famed evangelist Jonathan Edwards, daughter of Pierpont Edwards, head of the Democratic Party in Connecticut, and first cousin of Yale's president, Timothy Dwight, the state's leading Federalist, further tied him to Connecticut's ruling elite


1818

A constitution similar to the modern U.S. Constitution was not adopted in Connecticut until 1818 add something

 

In 1818, the court became a separate entity, independent of the legislative and executive branches add something

 

Benjamin Silliman - Some time around 1818, Ephraim Lane took some samples of rocks he found at an area called Saganawamps, now a part of the Old Mine Park Archeological Site in Trumbull, Connecticut to Silliman for identification


1823

Amos Bronson Alcott - By the summer of 1823, Alcott returned to Connecticut in debt to his father, who bailed him out after his last two unsuccessful sales trips


1825

Eli Whitney - Whitney died of prostate cancer on January 8, 1825, in New Haven, Connecticut, just a month after his 59th birthday


1827

Amos Bronson Alcott - On November 6, 1827, Alcott started teaching in Bristol,_Connecticut (United_Kingdom), Connecticut, still using the same methods he used in Cheshire, Connecticut, but opposition from the community surfaced quickly; he was unemployed by March 1828


1828

Benjamin Silliman - Silliman deemed slavery an "enormous evil" but favored colonization of free African Americans in Liberia, serving as a board member of the Connecticut colonization society between 1828 and 1835


1831

Thomas Clap - "Annals of Yale College, in New Haven, Connecticut, from Its Foundation, to the Year 1831


1839

Connecticut's extensive industry, dense population, flat terrain, and wealth encouraged the construction of railroads starting in 1839 add something


1840

By 1840, of line were in operation, growing to in 1850 and in 1860 add something


1852

Delia Bacon - She became a teacher in schools in Connecticut, New_Jersey, and New York, and then, until about 1852, became a distinguished professional lecturer, conducting, in various Eastern United States cities, classes for women in history and literature by methods she devised


1861

A surge of national unity in 1861 brought thousands flocking to the colors from every town and city add something


1863

The intensely fought 1863 election for governor was narrowly won by the Republicans add something


1865

Boston Corbett - After his discharge from the army in August 1865, Corbett went back to work as a hatter, first in Boston, later in Connecticut, and by 1870 in New Jersey


1872

The New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, called the "New Haven" or "The Consolidated", became the dominant Connecticut railroad company after 1872 add something


1875

Hartford has been the sole capital of Connecticut since 1875 add something

 

In 1875, the first telephone exchange in the world was established in New Haven add something

 

Josiah Willard Gibbs - He described that research in a long monograph titled "On the Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances," published in two parts by the Connecticut Academy between 1875 and 1878


1876

They joined the National League for one season in 1876, making them the state's only Major League baseball franchise before moving to Brooklyn, New York and disbanding one season later add something


1881

Amos Bronson Alcott - Near the end of his life, he fictionalized this experience in his book, "New Connecticut", originally circulated only among friends before its publication in 1881


1886

John Henry Twachtman - In 1886 he returned to America and settled in Connecticut, eventually buying a farm in Greenwich, Connecticut


1890

J. P. Morgan began financing the major New England railroads in the 1890s, dividing territory so that they would not compete add something

 

The first census in which less than half the population was classified as rural was 1890 add something

 

Thomas Hooker - On May 16, 1890, descendants of Thomas Hooker held their first reunion at Hartford, Connecticut


1896

Harriet Beecher Stowe - Stowe died on July 1, 1896, at age eighty-five in Hartford, Connecticut , Connecticut


1900

Gustave Whitehead - He told reporters, "There are several people still living in Bridgeport, Connecticut who testified to me under oath, they had seen Whitehead make flights along the streets of Bridgeport, Connecticut in the early 1900s


1901

Gustave Whitehead - Beach claimed authorship of only one "Scientific American" article about Whitehead, that of 8 June 1901, a few weeks before the report in the Bridgeport, Connecticut "Sunday Herald"

 

Gustave Whitehead - Claims for Whitehead's best-known reported manned powered flights depend largely on a newspaper article that said he achieved the feat in Connecticut in August 1901, and on an unsigned "Scientific American" article in September 1903 describing Whitehead making short flights low to the ground in a motorized triplane originally designed as a glider

 

Gustave Whitehead - Reports of Whitehead's August 1901 flight in Connecticut were noticed by the Smithsonian Institution

 

Gustave Whitehead - The aviation event for which Whitehead is now best-known reportedly took place in Fairfield, Connecticut on 14 August 1901

 

Gustave Whitehead - The most prominent witness statement came from the journalist from the Bridgeport, Connecticut Herald who described how he witnessed the preparations during the night and the first flight early in the morning of 14 August 1901


1902

Gustave Whitehead - John Whitehead arrived in Connecticut from California in April 1902, intending to help his brother


1903

Gustave Whitehead - According to William O'Dwyer, the Bridgeport, Connecticut "Daily Standard" newspaper reported that photos showing Gustave Whitehead in successful powered flight did exist and were exhibited in the window of Lyon and Grumman Hardware store on Main Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut in October 1903


1906

Edward Morley - In 1906, Morley moved to West Hartford, Connecticut, where he built a small house and a laboratory for his personal studies of rocks and minerals


1908

He lived in Redding from 1908 until his death in 1910 add something


1909

Gustave Whitehead - Orville Wright denied that he or his brother ever visited Whitehead at his shop and stated that the first time they were in Bridgeport, Connecticut was 1909 "and only in passing through on the train


1911

In 1911, Connecticut's oyster production reached its peak at nearly 25 million pounds of oyster meats add something


1912

By 1912, the New Haven operated over of track with 120,000 employees add something


1916

Wallace Stevens - When this job was abolished as a result of mergers in 1916, he joined the home office of Hartford, Connecticut Accident and Indemnity Company and left New York City to live in Hartford, Connecticut, where he would remain the rest of his life

 

On June 21, 1916, the U.S. Navy made Groton the site for its East Coast submarine base and school add something


1917

The state enthusiastically supported the American war effort in 1917 and 1918, with large purchases of war bonds, a further expansion of industry, and an emphasis on increasing food production on the farms add something


1919

In 1919, J. Henry Roraback started the Connecticut Light & Power Co. which became the state's dominant electric utility add something


1920

1925

In 1925, Frederick Rentschler spurred the creation of Pratt & Whitney in Hartford to develop engines for aircraft; the company became an important military supplier in World War II and one of the three major manufacturers of jet engines in the world add something


1926

In 1926, Hartford had a franchise in the National Football League known as the Hartford Blues add something


1930

Grace Moore - During the 1930s they maintained homes in Hollywood , Cannes , and Connecticut


1933

Jim Mollison - On 22 July 1933, they took off from Wales, but their plane could not make it to Connecticut in the United States, crashing before landing there


1938

On September 21, 1938, the most destructive storm in New England history struck eastern Connecticut, killing hundreds of people add something


1940

On May 13, 1940, Igor Sikorsky made an untethered flight of the first practical helicopter add something


1948

The sloop is believed to be the last oyster sloop built in Connecticut, completed in Greenwich in 1948 add something


1950

Morton Downey, Jr. - He was a program director and announcer at a radio station in Connecticut in the 1950s, and later worked in various markets around the U.S., including Phoenix , Miami , San Diego and Seattle


1952

Prescott Bush represented Connecticut in the U.S. Senate from 1952 to 1963; his son George H.W. Bush and grandson George W. Bush both became Presidents of the United States add something

 

Since 1952, a PGA Tour golf tournament has been played in the Hartford area add something

 

Madeleine L'Engle - The family moved to a 200-year-old farmhouse called Crosswicks in Goshen, Connecticut in 1952


1953

Rod Serling - He and his family moved to Connecticut in early 1953


1955

Wallace Stevens - After he won the Pulitzer Prize in 1955, he was offered a faculty position at Harvard but declined since it would have required him to give up his vice-presidency of The Hartford, Connecticut

 

Wallace Stevens - Stevens may have been baptized a Catholic in April 1955 by Fr. Arthur Hanley, chaplain of St. Francis Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut , Connecticut, where Stevens spent his last days suffering from stomach cancer

 

Marilyn Monroe - On April 8, 1955, veteran journalist Edward R. Murrow interviewed Greene and his wife Amy, as well as Monroe, at the Greenes' home in Connecticut on a live telecast of the CBS program "Person to Person"


1957

George Metesky - Accompanied by Waterbury, Connecticut police, four NYPD detectives arrived at Metesky's home with a search warrant shortly before midnight on Monday, January 21, 1957


1960

Connecticut county governments were mostly eliminated in 1960, with the exception of sheriffs elected in each county add something


1964

Russell Hoban - That section on the artist points out that at the time the book's illustrations were copyrighted, in 1964, Hoban was teaching drawing at the School of Visual Arts, in New York, collaborating with his first wife on their fifth children's book, and living in Connecticut


1965

Finally, the current state constitution was implemented in 1965 add something

 

In 1965, Connecticut ratified its current constitution, replacing the document that had served since 1818 add something

 

The 1965 constitution absorbed a majority of its 1818 predecessor, but incorporated a handful of important modifications add something


1966

Keith Richards - Richards still owns Redlands, the Sussex estate he purchased in 1966, as well as a home in Weston, Connecticut and another in Turks & Caicos


1968

In 1968, commercial operation began for the Connecticut Yankee Nuclear Power Plant in East Haddam; in 1970, the Millstone Nuclear Power Station began operations in Waterford add something

 

Christopher Plummer - He and his third wife, British dancer and actress Elaine Regina Taylor, have been married since 1968 and live in a 100-year-old converted farm house in Connecticut

 

Gustave Whitehead - In 1968, Connecticut officially recognized Whitehead as "Father of Connecticut Aviation"


1969

From before World War 1 until 1969, Connecticut laws restricted the right to harvest oysters in state-owned beds to sailing vessels add something

 

John Perry Barlow - In 1969, Barlow graduated with high honors in comparative religion from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and spent two years traveling


1970

Joe Lieberman - He was elected as a "reform Democrat" in 1970 to the Connecticut Senate, where he served three terms as Majority Leader

 

Joe Lieberman - Lieberman was elected as a "reform Democrat" to the Connecticut Senate in 1970, where he served for 10 years, including the last six as Majority Leader

 

Gustave Whitehead - O'Dwyer said that in the 1970s he searched through old Bridgeport, Connecticut city directories and concluded that the newspaper likely misspelled the man's name, which he said was Andrew Suelli, who was a Swiss or German immigrant known as Zulli, and was Whitehead's next door neighbor before moving to the Pittsburgh area in 1902


1974

In 1974, Connecticut elected Democratic Governor Ella T. Grasso, who became the first woman in any state to be elected governor add something

 

In 1974, Ella Grasso was elected as the governor of Connecticut add something

 

Chris Dodd - Dodd returned to Connecticut, winning election in 1974 to the United States House of Representatives from Connecticut's 2nd congressional district and was reelected in 1976 and 1978


1975

The Hartford Whalers of the National Hockey League played in Hartford from 1975 to 1997 at the Hartford Civic Center add something

 

Edward Morley - His house in West Hartford, Connecticut was made a National Historic Landmark in 1975

 

Chris Dodd - Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Connecticut's 2nd congressional district and reelected twice, he served from January 4, 1975 to January 3, 1981


1979

Meat Loaf - Aday and his family moved to Stamford, Connecticut in 1979


1980

Joe Lieberman - He suffered his first defeat in Connecticut elections in the Reagan landslide year of 1980, losing the race for the Third District Congressional seat to Republican Lawrence Joseph DeNardis, a state senator from suburban Hamden, Connecticut with whom he had worked closely on bipartisan legislative efforts

 

Chris Dodd - He was elected United States Senator in the elections of 1980, and was the longest-serving senator in Connecticut's history


1981

Joe Lieberman - In 1981 he wrote an admiring biography of long-time Connecticut and national Democratic leader John Moran Bailey, reviewing in the book the previous 50 years of Connecticut political history


1982

Joe Lieberman - In 1982, he met his second wife, Hadassah Freilich Tucker, while he was running for Attorney General of Connecticut


1985

Taylor Caldwell - She died of heart failure in Greenwich, Connecticut on August 30, 1985


1986

Gustave Whitehead - In 1986, American actor and accomplished aviator Cliff Robertson, was contacted by the Hangar 21 group in Bridgeport, Connecticut and was asked to attempt to fly their reproduction No.21 while under tow behind a sports car, for the benefit of the press


1988

A series of terrible crashes at these plazas eventually contributed to the decision to remove the tolls in 1988 add something

 

Natalie Portman - Portman and her family first lived in Washington, D.C., but relocated to Connecticut in 1988, and settled on Long Island, New York, in 1990


1990

The resulting budget crisis helped elect Lowell Weicker as governor on a third-party ticket in 1990 add something

 

Anne Morrow Lindbergh - After suffering a series of strokes in the early 1990s, which left her confused and disabled, Anne continued to live in her home in Connecticut with the assistance of round-the-clock caregivers


1991

Before 1991, Connecticut had an investment-only income tax system add something


1992

In 1992, initial construction was completed on Foxwoods Casino at the Mashantucket Pequots reservation in eastern Connecticut, which became the largest casino in the Western Hemisphere add something

 

Rivers Cuomo - Raised in an ashram in Connecticut, Cuomo moved to Los Angeles at age 19, where he participated in a number of rock bands before founding Weezer in 1992


1995

Connecticut's record high temperature is which occurred in Danbury on July 15, 1995; the record low is which occurred in the Northwest Hills Falls Village on February 16, 1943, and Coventry on January 22, 1961 add something


1996

Jon Pertwee - Pertwee continued on the convention circuit and with his voice and television acting until his death from a heart attack in Connecticut on 20 May 1996, two months before his 77th birthday


1999

Ann Coulter - In 1999 and 2000, Coulter considered running for Congress in Connecticut on the Libertarian Party ticket to serve as a spoiler in order to throw the seat to the Democratic candidate and see that Republican Congressman Christopher Shays failed to gain re-election, as a punishment for Shays' vote against Clinton's impeachment


2000

In 2000, presidential candidate Al Gore chose Senator Joe Lieberman as his running mate, marking the first time that a major party presidential ticket included someone of the Jewish faith add something

 

In 2000, the county sheriff was abolished and replaced with the state marshal system, which has districts that follow the old county territories add something


2001

In the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, 65 state residents were killed, mostly Fairfield County residents who were working in the World Trade Center add something


2002

The UConn Huskies football team has played in the Football Bowl Subdivision since 2002, and has played in four bowl games add something

 

Ann Coulter - Coulter's age was disputed in 2002 while she was arguing that she was not yet 40, yet "Washington Post" columnist Lloyd Grove cited that she provided a birthdate of December 8, 1961, when registering to vote in New Canaan, Connecticut prior to the 1980 Presidential election

 

Katharine Hepburn - It was first performed in 2002 at the Hartford, Connecticut Stage


2003

Howard Fast - He died in Old Greenwich, Connecticut on March 12, 2003

 

Katharine Hepburn - The decision was made not to medically intervene, and she died on June 29, 2003, at the Hepburn family home in Fenwick, Connecticut


2004

In 2004, Republican Governor John G. Rowland resigned during a corruption investigation, later pleading guilty to federal charges add something

 

Chris Dodd - Dodd briefly considered running for President in 2004, but ultimately decided against such a campaign and endorsed fellow Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman

 

Petula Clark - In 2004, she toured Australia and New Zealand, appeared at the Hilton in Atlantic City, New Jersey, New Jersey, the Hummingbird Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Humphrey's in San Diego and the Mohegan Sun Casino in Uncasville, Connecticut, and participated in a multi-performer tribute to the late Peggy Lee at the Hollywood Bowl

 

Gertrude Chandler Warner - On July 3, 2004, The Gertrude Chandler Warner Boxcar Children Museum opened in Putnam, Connecticut


2005

Based on the 2005 estimates, Connecticut moved from the 29th most populous state to 30th add something

 

Teresa Wright - Teresa Wright died on March 6, 2005 of a heart attack at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut at the age of 86


2006

According to the US Census 2006 American Community Survey, New Haven has the highest percentage of commuters who bicycle to work of any major metropolitan center on the East Coast add something

 

Joe Lieberman - During his re-election bid in 2006, he lost the Democratic Party primary election but won re-election in the general election as a third party candidate under the party label "Connecticut for Lieberman"

 

Joe Lieberman - Lieberman sought the Democratic Party's renomination for U.S. Senate from Connecticut in 2006 but lost to Ned Lamont, a Greenwich businessman and antiwar candidate

 

Joe Lieberman - On August 8, 2006, Lieberman conceded the Democratic primary election to Ned Lamont, saying, "For the sake of our state, our country and my party, I cannot and will not let that result stand," and announced he would run in the 2006 November election as an independent candidate on the Connecticut for Lieberman ticket, against both Lamont and the Republican candidate, Alan Schlesinger


2007

Bill Bryson - In January 2007, Bryson was the Schwartz Visiting Fellow of the Pomfret School in Connecticut

 

Madeleine L'Engle - Madeleine L'Engle died of natural causes at Rose Haven, a nursing facility close to her home in Litchfield, Connecticut, on September 6, 2007, according to a statement by her publicist the following day


2008

Timothy Dwight IV - In 2008, The Library of America selected Dwight's account of the murders of Connecticut shopkeeper William Beadle for inclusion in its two-century retrospective of American True Crime

 

Chris Dodd - Same-sex couples have been able to marry in Connecticut since November 12, 2008, following the Connecticut Supreme Court's ruling


2009

Joe Lieberman - Senator Lieberman actively oversaw the government response to the H1N1 influenza pandemic and held four hearings on the subject in 2009, including one in Connecticut

 

Katharine Hepburn - The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center was opened in 2009 in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, the location of the Hepburn family beach home which she loved and later owned

 

Chris Dodd - On March 30, 2009, it was reported that former AIG Financial Products head Joseph Cassano personally solicited contributions from his employees in Connecticut via an e-mail in fall 2006 suggesting that the contributions were related to Dodd's ascension to the chairmanship of the Senate Banking Committee

 

In July 2009 the Connecticut legislature overrode a veto by Governor M. Jodi Rell to pass SustiNet, the first significant public-option health care reform legislation in the nation add something


2010

According to the Tax Foundation, the 2010 Census data shows Connecticut residents paying the 2nd highest average property taxes in the nation with only New Jersey ahead of them add something

 

As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index , and median household income in the United States add something

 

Malloy, the former mayor of Stamford, won the 2010 general election for Governor, and was sworn in on January 5, 2011 add something

 

Malloy, the former mayor of Stamford, won the 2010 general election for Governor, and was sworn in on January 5, 2011 add something

 

Jane Powell - As of 2010, Powell lives with her fifth husband, former child star Dickie Moore, in New York City and Connecticut, and is still active in television and theater

 

Triple H - In 2010, Levesque's role as an Executive Senior Advisor was officially formalized as he was given an office at WWE headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut

 

Bob Kerrey - In May 2010, he was selected to become the head of the Motion Picture Association of America, but he and the MPAA could not reach an agreement, so former Connecticut Senator Chris Dodd was chosen instead


2011

Connecticut was hit by three major storms in just over 14 months in 2011 and 2012, with all three causing extensive property damage and electric outages add something


2012

In April 2012 both houses of the Connecticut state legislature passed a bill that abolished the capital punishment for all future crimes, while 11 inmates who were waiting on the death row at the time could still be executed add something

 

On December 14, 2012, Adam Lanza shot and killed 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, and killed himself add something


2013

According to a 2013 study by Phoenix Marketing International, Connecticut had the third-largest number of millionaires per capita in the United States, with a ratio of 7,32 percent add something

 

Erika Slezak - The new online version of the series is currently shooting in Stamford,Connecticut and premiered on Hulu, Hulu Plus, and iTunes on April 29th, 2013

 

Erika Slezak - The revived series, taped in Stamford, Connecticut, premiered on & Hulu, Hulu Plus, and iTunes on April 29, 2013 and ran through August 19, 2013

 

In August 2013, Connecticut authorized a sales tax "holiday" for one week during which retailers did not have to remit sales tax on certain items and quantities of clothing add something


2015

The bus route opened to the public on March 28, 2015 add something


2016

In the summer and fall of 2016, Connecticut experienced a drought in many parts of the state, causing some water-use bans add something

 

Joe Lieberman - In March 2016, Lieberman was hired by Schaghicoke Tribal Nation for the purpose of assisting the group in demolishing Connecticut laws that gave exemptions to only the top two state gaming tribes to build casinos

 

The state's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in May 2016 was 5,7 percent, the 41st highest in the nation add something


2017

The UConn women's basketball team holds the record for the longest consecutive winning streak in NCAA college basketball at 111 games, a streak that ended in 2017 add something


2018

Several new stations were completed along the Connecticut shoreline recently, and a commuter rail service called the Hartford Line between New Haven and Springfield on Amtrak's New Haven-Springfield Line began operating in June 2018 add something


2019

In soccer, Hartford Athletic will begin play in the USL Championship in 2019, serving as the reserve team for the New England Revolution of Major League Soccer add something