Franklin Pierce

Knowledge Identifier: +Franklin_Pierce

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Franklin Pierce

14th President of the United States.add

Category: Politics

Born in 1804.

Countries: United States (78%), New Hampshire (5%), India (4%)

Main connections: James Buchanan, Bowdoin College, Affirmation in law

Linked to: Democratic Party, Whig Party, Constitutional Union Party, Electoral College

 

Timeline


 

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Franklin Pierce was born in 1804 add something


1820

In fall 1820, he entered Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, where he joined literary, political, and debating clubs. add something

 

Pierce attended school at Hillsborough Center and moved to the Hancock Academy in Hancock at the age of 11; he transferred to Francestown Academy in the spring of 1820. add something

 

Bowdoin College - Bowdoin came into its own in the 1820s, a decade in which Maine became an independent state as a result of the Missouri Compromise and the college graduated a number of its most famous alumni, including future United States President Franklin Pierce, class of 1824, and writers Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, both of whom graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1825


1824

In his second year of college his grades were the lowest of his class, but he worked to improve them and ranked third among his classmates when he graduated in 1824. add something

 

Jonathan Cilley - While at Bowdoin he became close friends with future President Franklin Pierce, a member of the class of 1824


1826

In 1826 he entered a law school in Northampton, Massachusetts, studying under Governor Levi Woodbury, and later Judges Samuel Howe and Edmund Parker, in Amherst, New Hampshire. add something


1827

He was admitted to the bar and began a law practice in Concord, New Hampshire , New Hampshire, in 1827. add something


1828

In 1828 he was elected to the lower house of the New Hampshire General Court, the New Hampshire House of Representatives. add something


1829

He served in the State House from 1829 to 1833, and as Speaker from 1832 to 1833. add something


1832

In 1832, Pierce was elected as a Democrat to the 23rd and 24th Congresses (March 4, 1833 – March 4, 1837). add something


1836

In 1836, he was elected by the New Hampshire General Court as a Democrat to the United States Senate, serving from March 4, 1837, to February 28, 1842, when he resigned. add something

 

The Whigs' platform was almost indistinguishable from that of the Democrats, reducing the campaign to a contest between the personalities of the two candidates and helping to drive voter turnout in the election to its lowest level since 1836. add something


1837

Asa Fowler - Admitted to the bar in February 1837, Fowler was in practice by himself until September 1838 when he formed a partnership with Franklin Pierce, the future president of the United States


1844

Peter Parker (physician) - The 1844 treaty stipulated that it could be renegotiated after 12 years, and in 1856, president Franklin Pierce sent Parker to China in order to revise the treaty and gain more concessions from the Qing Empire


1845

He was the United States Attorney for the District of New Hampshire from 1845 to 1847. add something


1847

In March 1847, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers and took command of a brigade of reinforcements for Winfield Scott's army marching on Mexico City. add something


1850

He returned home and served as president of the New Hampshire state constitutional convention in 1850. add something

 

To unite the various Democratic Party factions before voting on a nominee, delegates adopted a party platform that rejected further "agitation" over the slavery issue and supported the Compromise of 1850. add something


1852

At the Democratic National Convention of 1852, Pierce was not a serious candidate for the presidential nomination. add something

 

Hannibal Hamlin - A Democrat at the beginning of his career, Hamlin supported the candidacy of Franklin Pierce in 1852

 

Isaac Stevens - Having been a firm supporter of Franklin Pierce's candidacy for President of the United States in 1852, Stevens was rewarded by President Pierce on March 17, 1853 by being named governor of the newly-created Washington Territory

 

Benjamin Pierce (governor) - He was succeeded by his younger brother, future president Franklin Pierce in 1852, and was later succeeded by Benjamin's youngest son, Henry Dearborn Pierce in 1873

 

Hugh J. Jewett - In 1852 he was Presidential elector, and supported Franklin Pierce for president

 

Benjamin McCulloch - In 1852, President Franklin Pierce promised him command of the U.S. Second Cavalry, but Secretary of War Jefferson Davis gave it instead to Albert Sidney Johnston

 

John Cochrane (general) - In 1852, he campaigned for Franklin Pierce who appointed him Surveyor of the Port of New York in 1853

 

Jefferson Davis - In the weeks leading up to the presidential election of 1852, he campaigned in numerous Southern states for Democratic candidates Franklin Pierce and William R. King

 

William Andrew Quarles - Interested in politics, he was a Democratic presidential elector in 1852, supporting Franklin Pierce's candidacy

 

Gideon Johnson Pillow - Pillow's antagonism for Scott was reflected in the 1852 election for president, when he opposed Scott's candidacy, supporting instead a former subordinate of his in the Mexican-American War, Franklin Pierce

 

Isaiah Rynders - Rynders was involved in the successful presidential elections of Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan, during the presidential elections of 1852 and 1856 respectively, and was appointed by Buchanan as U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of New York in 1857

 

Isaiah Rynders - Rynders was involved in the successful presidential elections of Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan, during the presidential elections of 1852 and 1856 respectively, and was appointed by Buchanan as U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of New York in 1857

 

Horatio Seymour - Seymour and the Softs supported the candidacy of their leader, Marcy, for the presidency in 1852, but when he was defeated they enthusiastically campaigned for Franklin Pierce in 1852


1853

Francis Burt (Nebraska) - Due to his active participation in the Democratic Party, President Franklin Pierce appointed Burt Third Auditor of the United States Treasury Department in 1853

 

David Meriwether (Kentucky) - He was appointed by President Franklin Pierce as Governor of the Territory of New Mexico, after the position was turned down by Solon Borland, from 1853 to 1855

 

Daniel Sickles - In 1853 he became corporation counsel of New York City , but resigned soon afterward to become secretary of the U.S. legation in London , under James Buchanan, by appointment of President Franklin Pierce

 

Thomas Kilby Smith - In 1853 he was appointed by President Franklin Pierce as the special agent in the Post Office Department at Washington, D.C., and later United States Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio and deputy clerk of Hamilton County

 

Thomas W. Ward - In 1853 he was elected the 10th mayor of Austin but resigned in September to accept an appointment by President Franklin Pierce as United States consul to Panama

 

Robert Dale Owen - In 1853, Franklin Pierce appointed Owen as United States minister to the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies at Naples

 

Daniel S. Dickinson - In 1853, President Franklin Pierce appointed him as Collector of the Port of New York, but he declined to take office

 

George Henry Williams - In 1853, Williams was appointed Chief Justice of the Oregon Territory by President Franklin Pierce

 

Teresa Bagioli Sickles - In 1853, he became corporation counsel of New York City , but soon resigned to serve as secretary of the U.S. legation in London under James Buchanan, by appointment of President Franklin Pierce

 

William L. Marcy - Marcy returned to public life in 1853 to serve as United States Secretary of State under President Franklin Pierce

 

Affirmation in law - On Friday, March 4, 1853, Franklin Pierce became the 14th President of the United States and has been the only president to date who affirmed rather than swore to the oath of office

 

Affirmation in law - On Friday, March 4, 1853, Franklin Pierce became the 14th President of the United States and has been the only president to date who affirmed rather than swore to the oath of office

 

David Allen Smalley - President Franklin Pierce appointed him Collector of Customs for the District of Vermont in April 1853

 

Samuel Williams Inge - He resumed the practice of law and was appointed by President Franklin Pierce as a United States attorney for the northern district of California on April 1, 1853

 

Willis A. Gorman - Gorman, politically a Democrat, served as the second Territorial Governor of Minnesota from May 15, 1853, to April 23, 1857, at the appointment of President Franklin Pierce

 

Elisha Hunt Allen - When he was replaced by an appointment from the Democratic Party president Franklin Pierce in August 1853, he decided to stay due to the severe shortage of legal professionals, and became a citizen of the Kingdom of Hawaii

 

Peter Dumont Vroom - He was appointed by President Franklin Pierce as United States Minister to Prussia from November 4, 1853 through August 10, 1857


1854

Pierce fulfilled the expectations of Southerners who had supported him by vigilantly enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act when Anthony Burns was seized in Boston in 1854 and returned to his owner. add something

 

The Kansas-Nebraska Act, passed in 1854, divided the Whigs. add something

 

The greatest challenge to the country's equilibrium during the Pierce administration, though, was the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854. add something

 

Roger Atkinson Pryor - After getting involved in politics, Pryor was appointed by President Franklin Pierce as a diplomat to Greece in 1854

 

Dorothea Dix - Dix's land bill passed both houses of Congress, but in 1854 President Franklin Pierce vetoed it, arguing that the federal government should not commit itself to social welfare, which was properly the responsibility of the states


1855

Isaac Blackford - Appointed by President Franklin Pierce, he served as a federal court judge of the newly created United States Court of Claims dealing with financial claims against the federal government from 1855 until his death

 

Albert Sidney Johnston - In 1855 President Franklin Pierce appointed him colonel of the new 2nd U.S. Cavalry , a new regiment, which he organized

 

Alvin Peterson Hovey - In 1855, Hovey was appointed by United States President Franklin Pierce to serve as US Attorney for Indiana

 

Norman Eddy - Undaunted, Eddy continued his political career as Attorney General of the Territory of Minnesota, serving as an appointee of President Franklin Pierce in 1855

 

James M. Love - He received a recess appointment from President Franklin Pierce on October 5, 1855, to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Iowa vacated by John James Dyer


1856

After losing the Democratic nomination for reelection in 1856, Pierce retired and traveled with his wife overseas. add something

 

Horatio Seymour - In 1856 he was considered a possible compromise presidential candidate in the event of a deadlock between Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan until Seymour wrote a letter definitively ruling himself out from consideration

 

Winfield Scott - Scott lost to Democrat Franklin Pierce in the general election, but remained a popular national figure, receiving a brevet promotion in 1856 to the rank of lieutenant general, becoming the first American since George Washington to hold that rank

 

Horace Tabor - In January 1856, Tabor was elected to the Free-State Topeka Legislature, but that body was soon dispersed by President Franklin Pierce in favor of the pro-slavery legislature that had been elected under the influence of "Border Ruffians" from Missouri

 

McQueen McIntosh - On February 27, 1856, McIntosh was nominated by President Franklin Pierce to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida vacated by Isaac H. Bronson

 

Andrew Gordon Magrath - On May 9, 1856, Magrath was nominated by President Franklin Pierce to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina vacated by Robert Budd Gilchrist

 

Isaac Edward Morse - He was appointed by President Franklin Pierce on December 2, 1856, as one of two special commissioners to New Granada to negotiate concerning the transit of citizens, officers, soldiers, and seamen of the United States across the Isthmus of Panama


1857

This sent Pierce and his wife into a plummeting despair, affecting his presidency until he left office in 1857. add something

 

Nathaniel Hawthorne - In 1857, his appointment ended at the close of the Pierce administration and the Hawthorne family toured France and Italy

 

David Allen Smalley - On February 2, 1857, Smalley was nominated by President Franklin Pierce to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Vermont vacated by the death of Samuel Prentiss the month before

 

Samuel Treat - On March 3, 1857, Treat was nominated by President Franklin Pierce to seat as a federal judge on the newly established United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri, created by 11 Stat

 

Stephen Decatur Trenchard - The ship left Norfolk, Virginia, Virginia, on December 7, 1857, but a series of mechanical breakdowns meant that she did not get to sea until the 11th, preceding to Madeira with the former President Franklin Pierce, his wife Jane, and their suite as passengers


1859

George Law Curry - U.S. President Franklin Pierce officially appointed Curry to the position, which he held until Oregon Statehood in 1859


1860

As early as 1860, Pierce had written to Davis about "the madness of northern abolitionism. add something

 

In 1860 many Democrats viewed Pierce as a solid compromise choice for the presidential nomination, uniting both Northern and Southern wings of the party, but Pierce declined to run. add something

 

Bowdoin College - Following in the footsteps of President Pierce and House Speaker Thomas Brackett Reed, class of 1860, several 20th century Bowdoin graduates have assumed prominent positions in national government while representing the Pine Tree State


1862

Pierce's stand won him admirers with the emerging Northern Peace Democrats, but enraged certain members of the Lincoln administration: in 1862 Secretary of State William Seward sent Pierce a letter accusing him of being a member of the seditious Knights of the Golden Circle. add something


1863

John Littleton Dawson - During his time away from congress, President Franklin Pierce offered him the governorship of Kansas Territory, but he declined so that he could run for congress again, which he was elected to again in 1863, and served on the 38th and 39th congresses from March 4, 1863 until March 3, 1867


1864

In 1864, friends again put his name in play for the Democratic nomination, but by a letter read out loud to the delegates, Pierce said he would not run. add something


1869

At his inauguration, Pierce, at age 48, was the youngest President to have taken office, a record he would keep until Ulysses S. Grant took office in 1869 at 46 years old. add something

 

Franklin Pierce died in 1869 add something

 

Franklin Pierce died in Concord, New Hampshire, New Hampshire, at 4:49 am on October 8, 1869, at 64 years old from cirrhosis of the liver add something


1976

New York, New York: Harper & Row, 1976 add something


2004

New York: Children's Press-Scholastic, 2004 add something


2010

When the school was renamed in 2010, a Franklin Pierce Center for Intellectual Property was established add something

 

Warren G. Harding - In 2010, a Siena College Research Institute survey of 238 presidential scholars ranked Harding 41st among the 43 men who had been president, between Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan ; Andrew Johnson was adjudged the worst