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Connections

Rex Stout
(Literature)
Edmond Locard
(Philosophy)
BBC Radio 4
(Journalism)
Rupert Davies
(Movies & TV)
Claude Barma
(Movies & TV)
Irene Shubik
(Movies & TV)
Michael Gambon
(Movies & TV)
 

See also

Georges Simenon

Knowledge Identifier: +Georges_Simenon

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Georges Simenon

Belgian writer add

Category: Literature

Born in 1903.

Countries: France (29%), United Kingdom (21%), Belgium (21%)

Main connections: Rex Stout, Edmond Locard, BBC Radio 4

Linked to: Gestapo, Le Soir, Soviet Union, New York Times Company

 

Timeline


 

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Georges Simenon was born in 1903 add something


1905

In April 1905, two years after Georges Simenon's birth, the family moved to 3 rue Pasteur in Liège's Outremeuse neighborhood add something


1906

Georges Simenon's brother Christian was born in September 1906 and eventually became their mother's favorite child, much to Georges Simenon's chagrin add something


1908

Then, between 1908 and 1914, he attended the Institut Saint-André add something


1911

Later, in February 1911, the Simenons moved to 53 rue de la Loi, in the Outremeuse add something


1914

In September 1914, shortly after the beginning of the First World War, he began his studies at the Collège Saint-Louis, a Jesuit high school add something


1916

Rupert Davies - "'Rupert Davies"' was a British actor best remembered for playing the title role in the BBC's 1960s television adaptation of "Maigret", based on Georges Simenon's "Maigret" novels


1917

In February 1917, the Simenon family moved to a former post office building in the Amercoeur neighborhood add something


1918

Using his father's heart condition as a pretext, Simenon decided to put an end to his studies in June 1918, not even taking the Collège Saint-Louis' year-end exams add something


1919

In January 1919, the sixteen-year-old Simenon took a job at the "Gazette de Liège", a newspaper edited by Joseph Demarteau add something

 

June 1919 saw another move, this time to the rue de l'Enseignement, back in the Outremeuse neighborhood add something

 

Simenon's first novel, "Au Pont des Arches", was written in June 1919 and published in 1921 under his "G. Sim" pseudonym add something

 

Writing as "Monsieur Le Coq", he published more than 800 humorous pieces between November 1919 and December 1922 add something

 

Edmond Locard - The young Georges Simenon, later to become a well-known detective writer, is known to have attended some Locard lectures in 1919 or 1920


1922

Although he never resided in Belgium after 1922, he remained a Belgian citizen throughout his life add something

 

Désiré Simenon died in 1922 and this served as the occasion for the author to move to Paris with Régine Renchon , at first living in the 17th arrondissement, not far from the Boulevard des Batignolles add something


1923

Simenon and Tigy returned briefly to Liège in March 1923 to marry add something


1928

A reporting assignment had Simenon on a lengthy sea voyage in 1928, giving him a taste for boating add something


1929

In 1929, he decided to have a boat built, the "Ostrogoth" add something


1930

In 1930, the most famous character invented by Simenon, Commissaire Maigret, made his first appearance in a piece in "Detective" written at Joseph Kessel's request add something


1931

The first novel in the series, "Pietr-le-Letton", appeared in 1931; the last one, "Maigret et M. Charles", was published in 1972 add something


1932

Between 1932 and 1936, Simenon, Tigy, and Boule lived at La Richardière, a 16th century manor house in Marsilly at the Charente-Maritime département add something


1934

A trip around the world followed in 1934 and 1935 add something


1938

At the beginning of 1938, he rented the villa Agnès in La Rochelle and then, in August, purchased a farm house in Nieul-sur-Mer where his and Tigy's only child, Marc, was born in 1939 add something


1940

Also in the early 1940s, Simenon had a health scare when a local doctor misdiagnosed him with a serious heart condition , giving him only months to live add something


1945

Simenon escaped questioning in France and in 1945 arrived, along with Tigy and Marc, in North America add something


1949

After resolving numerous legal difficulties, Simenon and Tigy were divorced in 1949 add something

 

He and Tigy remained married until 1949, but it was now a marriage in name only add something


1950

In any case, Simenon was under investigation at the end of the war because he had negotiated film rights of his books with German studios during the occupation and in 1950 was sentenced to a five-year period during which he was forbidden to publish any new work add something

 

Simenon and Denyse Ouimet were married in Reno, Nevada in 1950 and eventually had three children, Johnny , Marie-Jo and Pierre add something


1952

In 1952, Simenon paid a visit to Belgium and was made a member of the Académie Royale de Belgique add something

 

This town forms the background for his 1952 novel "La Mort de Belle" add something


1955

In accordance with the divorce agreement, Tigy continued to live in close proximity to Simenon and their son Marc, an arrangement that continued until they all returned to Europe in 1955 add something

 

Simenon and his family returned to Europe in 1955, first living in France before settling in Switzerland add something


1961

Teresa, who had been hired by Simenon as a housekeeper in 1961, had by this time become romantically involved with him and remained his companion for the rest of his life add something


1964

Simenon and Denyse Ouimet separated definitively in 1964 add something


1966

Irene Shubik - In parallel with producing the second season of "Out of the Unknown", Shubik produced "Thirteen Against Fate", a series of adaptations of short crime stories by "Maigret" creator Georges Simenon broadcast between 19 June 1966 and 11 September 1966


1967

Claude Barma - In 1967, "Les Enquêtes du commissaire Maigret" depicted the popular character Jules Maigret, created by Georges Simenon


1974

Rex Stout - McAleer quotes a letter dated May 24, 1974, that he received from Torczyner, a New York collector who was Georges Simenon's attorney


1978

His long-troubled daughter Marie-Jo committed suicide in Paris in 1978 at the age of 25, an event that darkened Simenon's later years add something


1981

The film was made for ATV and shown in the UK on the ITV Network in 1981 add something


1984

Simenon underwent surgery for a brain tumor in 1984 and made a good recovery add something


1988

He gave his last televised interview in December 1988 add something


1989

The ambiguities of the war years notwithstanding, the city of La Rochelle eventually honored Simenon, naming a quay after him in 1989 add something


Georges Simenon died in 1989 add something

 

Georges Simenon died in his sleep of natural causes on the night of 3-4 September 1989 in Lausanne add something


1992

Michael Gambon - In 1992 he played a psychotic general in the Barry Levinson film "Toys" and he starred as Georges Simenon's detective Inspector Jules Maigret in an ITV adaptation of Simenon's series of books


2003

However, in 2003, his son Johnny participated in a different event honoring his father add something

 

In 2003, the collection La Pléiade has included 21 of Simenon's novels, in 2 volumes add something

 

Julian Barnes - In 2003, Barnes appeared as the voice of Georges Simenon in a BBC Radio 4 series of adaptations of Inspector Maigret stories


2005

In 2005, he was nominated for the title of De Grootste Belg / Le plus grand Belge in two separate television shows add something


2016

Directed by Robert Icke at the Lyttelton Theatre, London, in October 2016 add something