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Theresa May
(Politics)
Charles Clarke
(Politics)
David Blunkett
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Jacqui Smith
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Teresa May
(Movies & TV)
Sajid Javid
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Roy Jenkins
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Home Secretary

Knowledge Identifier: &Home_Secretary

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Home Secretary

Minister responsible for the Home Office of the United Kingdom, one of the four Great Offices of State add

Category: Politics

Founded in 1931.

Countries: United Kingdom (80%), (7%), United States (2%)

Main connections: Theresa May, Charles Clarke, David Blunkett

Linked to: Conservative Party, Labour Party, Liberal Party, British Whig Party

 

Timeline


 

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1937

Norman Birkett, 1st Baron Birkett - In May 1937 Birkett was appointed Chairman of the Inter-Departmental Committee for Abortion set up by the Minister of Health and Home Secretary, preparing a report "to inquire into the prevalence of abortion, and the law relating thereto, and to consider what steps can be taken by more effective enforcement of the law", something which occupied him for two years


1939

Norman Birkett, 1st Baron Birkett - After the outbreak of World War II in 1939, he became a member of a committee advising the Home Secretary on the detention of suspected enemy agents


1945

David Lloyd George - They were politically faithful to their father throughout his life; but after 1945, each drifted away from the Liberal Party, Gwilym finishing his career as a Conservative Home Secretary while Megan became a Labour MP in 1957, perhaps symbolising the fate of much of the old Liberal Party


1946

Daniel Granville West, Baron Granville-West - West was elected as Member of Parliament for Pontypool in a by-election in July 1946 and became Parliamentary Private Secretary to James Chuter Ede, Home Secretary, in 1950


1952

Security Service - The Prime Minister's personal responsibility for the Service was delegated to the Home Secretary Maxwell-Fyfe in 1952, with a directive issued by the Home Secretary setting out the role and objectives of the Director-General


1957

Jocelyn Simon, Baron Simon of Glaisdale - He took charge of the bill that became the Homicide Act 1957, earning the respect of Rab Butler, Home Secretary

 

Albert Goozee - Despite the dismissal of the appeal, Rab Butler, the Home Secretary, recommended Goozee be reprieved on 25 January 1957, four days before he was due to be executed, on grounds that he had been "provoked beyond reason", and the sentence commuted to life imprisonment

 

Norman Birkett, 1st Baron Birkett - After retiring from the Bench, he became chairman of a committee of Privy Counsellors on 13 June 1957 holding an inquiry into the Home Secretary's use of telephone tapping


1958

David Renton, Baron Renton - Serving under Home Secretary Rab Butler, he pushed through acts including the Life Peerages Act 1958, the Street Offences Act 1958 and the Commonwealth Immigration Act 1962


1960

Clive Bossom - During this time he was Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance from 1960 to 1961, to the Secretary of State for Air from 1962 to 1964 and to the Home Secretary from 1970 to 1972


1966

Gordon Oakes - Oakes served as Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Home Secretary from 1966, and in the government of Harold Wilson as a junior minister and as a Minister of State under James Callaghan

 

John Christie (murderer) - This finding, challenged in subsequent legal processes, enabled the Home Secretary to grant Evans a posthumous pardon for the murder of his daughter in October 1966


1967

Stephen Abrams - At the 1967 Tory party conference, the Shadow Home Secretary, Quintin Hogg said he was "profoundly shocked by the irresponsibility of those who wanted to change the law", describing their arguments as "casuistic, confused, sophistical and immature

 

Stephen Abrams - Two weeks later, on 15 February 1967, Abrams gave evidence before the University Committee on Student Health, which agreed to pursue his suggestion that the Home Secretary be prevailed upon to institute an inquiry


1969

Harold Wilson - The First Wilson Government made assistance to deprived urban communities a specific policy of national government in 1969 with the passage of the Local Government Grants Act, which empowered the Home Secretary to dispense grants to assist local authorities in providing extra help to areas of special social need


1971

Stephen Abrams - However he later quietly reversed his position, and many of the Report's recommendations became law in 1971 - ironically enacted by Hogg who, after a change of government, had taken over as Home Secretary


1972

Reginald Maudling - As Home Secretary, he was responsible for the British Government's Northern Irish policy during the period that included Bloody Sunday in 1972; shortly thereafter, he left office due to an unrelated scandal in one of the companies of which he was director


1977

European Commission - The external representation of the Community took a step forward when President Roy Jenkins, recruited to the presidency in January 1977 from his role as Home Secretary of the United Kingdom's Labour government, became the first President to attend a G8 summit on behalf of the Community


1979

William Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw - Despite standing, and losing convincingly, against Thatcher in the second round, Whitelaw managed to maintain his position as Deputy Leader until the 1979 general election, when he was appointed Home Secretary and Deputy Prime Minister in Thatcher's new government


1980

William Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw - He was the British Home Secretary during the 6 day long Iranian Embassy siege in London , 30 April 1980-5 May 1980


1983

Leon Brittan - He was Home Secretary from 1983 to 1985, and was moved to Secretary of State for Trade and Industry


1987

William Hague - He was first an unsuccessful parliamentary candidate for Wentworth in 1987, but was elected to Parliament in a by-election in 1989 as member for Richmond, North Yorkshire, succeeding former Home Secretary Leon Brittan


1990

Michael Chan, Baron Chan - He was active in the field of race relations, serving as an advisor to the Home Secretary and as a Commissioner for the Commission for Racial Equality between 1990 and 1995, and as a member of the Sentencing Panel from 1999

 

Douglas Hurd - In mid-November 1990, he supported Margaret Thatcher's candidature as Conservative Party leader against challenger Michael Heseltine, but on her withdrawal from the second round of the contest on 22 November, Hurd decided to enter the race as a moderate centre-right candidate, drawing on his reputation as a successful 'law-and-order' Home Secretary


1992

Liam Fox - A little over a year after his election in 1992, Fox was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Home Secretary, Michael Howard, in June 1993


1993

Michael Howard - In this capacity he encouraged the United States to participate in the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, but shortly afterwards he was appointed Home Secretary in a 1993 reshuffle initiated by the sacking of Norman Lamont as Chancellor


1995

Stephen Tumim - He served under successive Conservative Home Secretaries , until Michael Howard declined to renew his contract in 1995, and David Ramsbotham was appointed

 

David Ramsbotham, Baron Ramsbotham - Ramsbotham was Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons for England and Wales from 1 December 1995 to 2001 when he was succeeded by Anne Owers CBE. As Chief Inspector of Prisons, he had an at times strained relationship with Home Secretaries Michael Howard and Jack Straw, and this contributed to his contract not being continued for the full eight years that had originally been possible


1997

David Blunkett - Blind since birth, and coming from a poor family in one of Sheffield's most deprived districts, he rose to become Education and Employment Secretary, Home Secretary and Work and Pensions Secretary in Tony Blair's Cabinet following Labour's victory in the 1997 general election

 

David Laws - He unsuccessfully contested Folkestone and Hythe in 1997, against Conservative Home Secretary Michael Howard

 

Norman Warner, Baron Warner - He was Senior Policy Adviser to Jack Straw when he was the Home Secretary from 1997 to 2001

 

Alison Halford - In 1997, she alleged that her telephones had been tapped, resulting in her winning a case at the European Court of Human Rights against the Home Secretary

 

Phil Woolas - On 21 May, Home Secretary Jacqui Smith announced that all Gurkha veterans who had served four years or more in the British Army before 1997 would be allowed to settle in Britain

 

Michael Howard - The increased minimum term was overturned in 1997 by the House of Lords, who ruled that it was "unlawful" for the Home Secretary to decide on minimum sentences for young offenders


1998

Euan Sutherland - In response to the commission's findings, the Home Secretary Jack Straw agreed with Morris and Sutherland that a Bill would be proposed to Parliament in the summer of 1998 to reduce the age of consent for homosexual acts to 16

 

Chris Morris (activist) - In response to the court's findings, the Home Secretary Jack Straw agreed with Sutherland and Morris that a Bill would be proposed to Parliament in the summer of 1998 to reduce the age of consent for homosexual acts to 16

 

Gary McKinnon - Mitting distinguished two issues which were arguable, the first being whether Professor Turk's opinion that McKinnon would certainly commit suicide if extradited means that the Home Secretary must refuse extradition under section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998


1999

Ali Dizaei - He was appointed an adviser on race issues to the Home Secretary, and transferred to the Metropolitan Police Service on promotion to Superintendent on 29 March 1999 as a staff officer to Assistant Commissioner Ian Johnston


2000

Margaret Thatcher - Pinochet was released in March 2000 on medical grounds by the Home Secretary Jack Straw, without facing trial


2001

Andy Burnham - Following his election to Parliament, he became a member of the Health Select Committee from 2001 until 2003, when he was appointed the Parliamentary Private Secretary to Home Secretary David Blunkett

 

David Blunkett - He was promoted to become Home Secretary following the 2001 general election, a position he held until 2004, when he resigned following highly publicised matters related to his personal life


2002

Kenneth Noye - The trial judge at Noye's trial for murder did not make any recommendation as to how long Noye should spend in prison, but the Home Secretary David Blunkett set a minimum term before Noye may apply for parole of 16 years in 2002

 

Abu Qatada - In October 2002, the Home Secretary, David Blunkett, detained Abu Qatada indefinitely without trial under Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 , which at that time provided for such detention

 

Unity Mitford - On 1 December 2002, following the release of declassified documents , investigative journalist Martin Bright published an article in "The Observer" that claimed Home Secretary John Anderson intervened to prevent Mitford being questioned on her return from Germany and that the shooting, which "has become part of the Mitford myth," may have been invented to excuse this


2004

Jerry Vlasak - Nevertheless, as a result of his statements, he and his wife were banned from entering the United Kingdom in 2004, on the grounds that their presence, according to the Home Secretary, "would not be conducive to the public good

 

David Blunkett - Though there was no evidence Blunkett was responsible for the email or its title, he resigned as Home Secretary on 15 December 2004, saying that questions about his honesty were damaging the government


2005

Formerly, the Home Secretary was the minister responsible for prisons and probation in England and Wales; however, in 2005 those responsibilities were transferred to the newly created Ministry of Justice under the Lord Chancellor add something

 

Chris Grayling - He served in the Shadow Cabinet from 2005 to 2010 and was the party's Shadow Home Secretary from 2009 to 2010

 

Moazzam Begg - In February 2005, British Home Secretary Charles Clarke used the Royal Prerogative, historic powers enjoyed by the monarchy which have been passed to politicians, to refuse to issue Begg a passport

 

Peter Neyroud - His position within the National Policing Improvement Agency was announced by the Home Secretary Charles Clarke in October 2005, taking up the post as the CEO in January 2006

 

Ronnie Biggs - On 26 October 2005, the Home Secretary Charles Clarke declined his appeal stating that his illness was not terminal


2006

John Gieve - Later in 2006, Charles Clarke was dismissed as Home Secretary and replaced by John Reid, who shortly after his appointment made a statement to Parliament in which he described the Home Office as "unfit for purpose"

 

Surrey Police - Under controversial merger plans announced by Home Secretary, Charles Clarke, in 2006, the number of police forces in England and Wales would have been cut from 43 to 24

 

West Mercia Police - When John Reid became Home Secretary in 2006, he put plans to merge the forceon hold, and now it seems likely that the plans might be scrapped altogether

 

Cheshire Constabulary - It was proposed by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006 that Cheshire should merge with the Merseyside Police, to form a strategic police force, but these proposals were later abandoned

 

West Mercia Police - Under final proposals made by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006, it would merge with Staffordshire Police, Warwickshire Constabulary and West Midlands Police to form a single strategic force for the West Midlands region

 

Warwickshire Police - Under proposals announced by the Home Secretary, Charles Clarke, on 6 February 2006, Warwickshire Police would have merged with Staffordshire Police, West Mercia Constabulary and West Midlands Police to form a single strategic force for the West Midlands region

 

Cleveland Police - Under proposals made by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006, a proposal for a merger with Northumbria Police and Durham Constabulary to form a single strategic police force for the North East England was suggested but there was no support for this

 

Lancashire Constabulary - Under proposals made by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006, it was to have be merged with Cumbria Constabulary

 

Staffordshire Police - Under proposals made by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006, it would have merged with Warwickshire Constabulary, West Mercia Constabulary and West Midlands Police to form a single strategic force for the West Midlands region

 

Merseyside Police - Under proposals made by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006, it would merge with Cheshire Constabulary to form a strategic police force

 

Northumbria Police - Under proposals made by the Home Secretary on 6 February 2006, it would merge with Cleveland Police and Durham Constabulary to form a single strategic police force for the North East England

 

Bedfordshire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary in March 2006 would have seen Bedfordshire Police merge with neighbouring forces Hertfordshire Constabulary and Essex Police to form a strategic police force

 

Nottinghamshire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary in March 2006 would have seen the force merge with the other four East Midlands forces to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

Cambridgeshire Constabulary - Proposals made by the Home Secretary, Charles Clarke, in March, Cambridgeshire 2006 would have seen the force merge with neighbouring Norfolk Constabulary and Suffolk Constabulary to form a strategic police force for East Anglia

 

Suffolk Constabulary - Proposals announced by the Home Secretary Charles Clarke on 20 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with neighbouring forces Norfolk Constabulary and Cambridgeshire Constabulary to form a strategic police force for East Anglia

 

Hertfordshire Constabulary - Proposals made by Charles Clarke, the Home Secretary, on 20 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with neighbouring forces Bedfordshire Police and Essex Police to form a strategic police force

 

Kent Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 saw Kent Police stay as a standalone strategic force for Kent and Medway; it had been suggested that Kent should merge with another police force

 

Leicestershire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with the other four East Midlands forces to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

Lincolnshire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with the other four East Midlands forces to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

Northamptonshire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with the other four East Midlands forces to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

Norfolk Constabulary - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 would see the force merge with neighbouring forces Cambridgeshire Constabulary and Suffolk Constabulary to form a strategic police force for East Anglia

 

Thames Valley Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 would see the force stay as a single strategic police force for the area, a merger with Hampshire Constabulary having been rejected

 

Derbyshire Constabulary - Proposals were made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 to integrate groups of police forces in England and Wales into 'strategic' forces, which he saw as being more 'fit for purpose' in terms of combating terrorism and organised crime

 

Sussex Police - Proposals were made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 to merge the force with Surrey Police forming a single strategic police force for Sussex and Surrey

 

Humberside Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 21 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with North Yorkshire Police, South Yorkshire Police and West Yorkshire Police to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

North Yorkshire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 21 March 2006 would have seen the force merge with West Yorkshire Police, South Yorkshire Police and Humberside Police to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

West Yorkshire Police - Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 21 March 2006 would see the force merge with North Yorkshire Police, South Yorkshire Police and Humberside Police to form a strategic police force for the entire region

 

Surrey Police - Police authorities had until 7 April 2006 to respond to the plans; the Home Secretary announced on 11 April 2006 that Surrey &Police and Sussex Police would merge by 2008

 

Abu Izzadeen - On 20 September 2006, Abu Izadeen and Anjem Choudary disrupted Home Secretary John Reid's first public meeting with Muslims since his appointment


2007

Chris Grayling - In June 2007, he was made Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, a post he held until January 2009 when he became Shadow Home Secretary

 

Andrew Gwynne - Between July 2007 and June 2009, he served as the Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Home Secretary, the Rt Hon Jacqui Smith MP. In June 2009 he became Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, the Rt Hon Ed Balls MP.


2008

Moazzam Begg - In April 2008, Begg and other former Guantánamo detainees filed lawsuits at Britain's High Court against the British attorney general, Home Secretary, Foreign Secretary, MI5, and MI6, accusing them of unlawful acts, negligence, and conspiracy in their abduction, treatment, and interrogation, and seeking millions of dollars in damages


2009

Gordon Brown - After Professor David Nutt, the chair of the ACMD, criticised this move in a lecture in 2009, he was asked to step down by Home Secretary Alan Johnson

 

David Omand - In 2009 he was asked by the Home Secretary, Alan Johnson, to carry out a review into the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to "satisfy ministers" that the council is "discharging the functions" that it is supposed to

 

Jacqui Smith - On 5 June 2009, she ceased to be Home Secretary in the Cabinet reshuffle, and lost her seat as Member of Parliament for Redditch in the 2010 General Election

 

Chris Grayling - As Shadow Home Secretary, Grayling provoked controversy in August 2009 when he compared Manchester's Moss Side area to the American TV crime drama "The Wire"

 

Tobias Menzies - He was the Home Secretary in the long-running television drama Spooks, since December 2009


2010

The current Home Secretary is The Rt Honourable Theresa May, MP, appointed on 12 May 2010 by the Prime Minister, David Cameron, to serve in the Conservative-Liberal Democratic coalition government add something

 

Theresa May - On 12 May 2010, May was appointed Home Secretary and Minister for Women and Equality by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Cameron as part of his first cabinet

 

Theresa May - On 2 June 2010, May faced her first major national security incident as Home Secretary with the Cumbria shootings

 

Nicholas Winton - A statue in his honour was unveiled at Maidenhead railway station by Home Secretary and local MP for Maidenhead, Theresa May, in September 2010

 

2011 England riots - In December 2010 Theresa May 0 , the Home Secretary, had said that the deployment of water cannon by police forces on the British mainland was an operational decision which had been "resisted until now by senior police officers


2011

2011 England riots - During riots, on 9 August 2011, UK Home Secretary Theresa May 0 said: "I think this is about sheer criminality


2012

Abu Qatada - On 20 April 2012, Abu Qatada requested the Home Secretary to revoke the deportation order of 18 February 2009

 

Abu Qatada - On 18 May 2012, the Home Secretary notified Abu Qatada of her refusal to revoke the order

 

Theresa May - On 11 June 2012, the Home Secretary, Theresa May, announced to Parliament that new restrictions would be introduced, which are intended to reduce the number of non-EEA family migrants

 

Gary McKinnon - On 16 October 2012, Home Secretary Theresa May announced to the House of Commons that the extradition had been blocked, saying that "Mr McKinnon's extradition would give rise to such a high risk of him ending his life that a decision to extradite would be incompatible with Mr McKinnon's human rights

 

Gary McKinnon - On 16 October 2012, after a series of legal proceedings in Britain, Home Secretary Theresa May withdrew his extradition order to the United States

 

Abu Qatada - On 12 November 2012, SIAC upheld the appeal, ruling that Abu Qatada was still at risk of having evidence obtained under torture used against him and that the Home Secretary was wrong not to revoke the deportation order against him

 

Sara Nathan (broadcaster) - She chairs The Animal Procedures Committee, a body that advises the British Home Secretary on matters related to animal experimentation in the UK. The APC will be abolished in December 2012, when the new European Directive is transposed and she will step down


2013

Abu Qatada - The Court of Appeal again rejected the Home Secretary's attempt to deport Qatada, in April 2013 denied her leave to appeal, on the basis that "states cannot expel someone where there is a real risk that they will face a trial based on evidence obtained by torture


2015

May was reappointed by Cameron on 8 May 2015 to serve as Home Secretary in the Conservative government add something


2016

Amber Rudd succeeded her as Home Secretary on 13 July 2016 add something

 

She stood down from this role on 13 July 2016 upon assuming the office of Prime Minister, succeeding Cameron add something


2018

The position of Home Secretary has been held by Sajid Javid since 30 April 2018 add something


2019

The position of Home Secretary has been held by Priti Patel since 24 July 2019 add something