John Cheever

Knowledge Identifier: +John_Cheever

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John Cheever

American novelist and short story writer add

Category: Literature

Born in 1912.

Countries: United States (50%), Massachusetts (20%), United Kingdom (10%)

Education: undef.

Main connections: Hope Lange, Massachusetts, John Updike

Linked to: The New Republic, Dartmouth College, Quincy High School, Yale Medical School

 

Timeline


 

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John Cheever was born in 1912 add something


1926

Around this time, Cheever's older brother Fred, forced to withdraw from Dartmouth in 1926 because of the family's financial crisis, re-entered his life "when the situation was most painful and critical," as John later wrote add something

 

In 1926, Cheever began attending Thayer Academy, a private day school, but he found the atmosphere stifling and performed poorly, finally transferring to Quincy, Massachusetts High in 1928 add something


1930

His grades continued to be poor, however, and, in March 1930, he was either expelled for smoking or departed of his own accord when the headmaster delivered an ultimatum to the effect that he must either apply himself or leave add something


1932

After the 1932 crash of Kreuger & Toll, in which Frederick Cheever had invested what was left of his money, the Cheever house on Winthrop Avenue was lost to foreclosure add something


1934

Cheever spent the summer of 1934 at Yaddo, which would serve as a second home for much of his life add something


1935

Maxim Lieber became his literary agent, 1935-1941 add something


1938

In 1938, he began work for the Federal Writers' Project in Washington, D. C., which he considered an embarrassing boondoggle add something


1942

Cheever enlisted in the Army on May 7, 1942 add something


1943

His first collection of short stories, "The Way Some People Live", was published in 1943 to mixed reviews add something

 

Cheever's daughter Susan was born on July 31, 1943 add something


1948

Cheever's son Benjamin was born on May 4, 1948 add something


1951

In 1951, Cheever wrote "Goodbye, My Brother," after a gloomy summer in Martha's Vineyard add something


1953

Cheever's second collection, "The Enormous Radio," was published in 1953 add something


1960

He began an affair with actress Hope Lange in the late 1960s add something


1964

"The Wapshot Scandal" was published in 1964, and received perhaps the best reviews of Cheever's career up to that point add something


1966

In the summer of 1966, a screen adaptation of "The Swimmer," starring Burt Lancaster, was filmed in Westport, Connecticut add something

 

Still, he blamed most of his marital woes on his wife, and in 1966 he consulted a psychiatrist, David C. Hays, about her hostility and "needless darkness add something


1972

Hope Lange - In 1972 she dated Frank Sinatra and began a relationship with married novelist John Cheever


1973

On May 12, 1973, Cheever awoke coughing uncontrollably, and learned at the hospital that he had almost died from pulmonary edema caused by alcoholism add something

 

Raymond Carver - In the fall semester of 1973, Carver was a teacher in the Iowa Writers' Workshop with John Cheever, but Carver stated that they did less teaching than drinking and almost no writing


1975

Cheever's drinking soon became suicidal and, in March 1975, his brother Fred, now virtually indigent, but sober after his own lifelong bout with alcoholism, drove John back to Ossining add something


1978

"The Stories of John Cheever" appeared in October, 1978, and became one of the most successful collections ever, selling 125,000 copies in hardback and winning universal acclaim add something


 

A compilation of his short stories, "The Stories of John Cheever", won the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and a National Book Critics Circle award, and its first paperback edition won a 1981 National Book award add something


1981

In the summer of 1981, a tumor was discovered in Cheever's right kidney and, in late November, he returned to the hospital and learned that the cancer had spread to his femur, pelvis, and bladder add something

 

John Updike - On "The Dick Cavett Show" in 1981, the novelist and short-story writer John Cheever was asked why he did not write book reviews and what he would say if given the chance to review Updike's "Rabbit is Rich"


John Cheever died in 1982 add something

 

Cheever's last novel, "Oh What a Paradise It Seems," was published in March 1982; only a hundred pages long and relatively inferior , the book received respectful reviews in part because it was widely known the author was dying of cancer add something

 

On April 27, 1982, six weeks before his death, Cheever was awarded the National Medal for Literature by the American Academy of Arts and Letters add something


1987

In 1987, Cheever's widow, Mary, signed a contract with a small publisher, Academy Chicago, for the right to publish Cheever's uncollected short stories add something

 

Colin Greenwood - While an undergraduate studying English at Peterhouse, Cambridge between 1987 and 1990, Greenwood read modern American literature, including Raymond Carver, John Cheever and other writers dealing with the tensions of post-war American society


1992

This was parodied to comedic effect in an episode of the TV sitcom "Seinfeld" in 1992, when one of the characters, Susan, discovers explicit love letters from Cheever to her father add something


1994

The contract led to a long legal battle and a book of 13 stories by the author entitled "Fall River and Other Uncollected Stories", published in 1994 by Academy Chicago Publishers add something


 

The book was published by Knopf on March 10, 2009, and won that year's National Book Critics Circle award in Biography, the Francis Parkman Prize, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer and James Tait Black Memorial Prize add something


2017

Cheever's name is mentioned in the lyrics of 2017 song "Carin at the Liquor Store" by the American band The National add something