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See also

Pulitzer Prize

Knowledge Identifier: $Pulitzer_Prize

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Pulitzer Prize

U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature, and musical composition add

Category: Literature (100)

Launched in 1961.

Countries: United States (86%), (5%), Canada (1%)

Main connections: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, The Washington Post, The New York Times

Linked to: Columbia University, National Review, Harvard University, Institute for Advanced Study

 

Timeline


 

This timeline needs to be reviewed and corrected, as it has been automatically generated from multiple web sources.
Please help improve it by adding dated informations, images and videos about Pulitzer Prize.


1961

The "Chicago Tribune" under the control of Colonel McCormick felt that the Pulitzer Prize was nothing more than a 'mutual admiration society' and not to be taken seriously; the paper refused to compete for the prize during McCormick's tenure up until 1961 add something


1962

Russell Baker - Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, Russell Baker, was the author of the nationally syndicated "Observer" column for the New York Times from 1962 to 1998


1963

Joseph Wershba - He was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for his work on "The Lee Harvey Oswald Story" in 1963

 

William Carlos Williams - In May 1963, he was posthumously *awarded the Pulitzer Prize for "Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems" and the Gold Medal for Poetry of the National Institute of Arts and Letters


1965

Duke Ellington - Ellington was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1965, but was turned down.

 

John Berryman - The book won the 1965 Pulitzer Prize for poetry, and solidified Berryman's standing as one of the most important poets of the post-World War II generation that included Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, and Delmore Schwartz


1966

Bernard Malamud - His 1966 novel "The Fixer", about antisemitism in Tsarist Russia, won both the National Book *award and the Pulitzer Prize


1967

Bernard Malamud - In 1967, his novel "The Fixer", about anti-semitism in Tsarist Russia, won the both the National Book *award for Fiction and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction


1969

Eddie Adams (photographer) - Adams won the 1969 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography and a World Press Photo award for the photograph , but would later lament its notoriety

 

William Tuohy - In 1969 Tuohy won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for his Vietnam War correspondence the previous year


1970

William Tuohy - In addition to the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting, Tuohy won the Overseas Press Club award for his reporting from the Middle East in 1970


1971

Maya Angelou - Her first volume of poetry "Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Diiie", published in 1971 shortly after "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" became a best-seller, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize

 

Tom Powers - His nephew, Thomas Powers, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1971 and is the author of several books on the intelligence community

 

Maya Angelou - She is a prolific writer of poetry; her volume "Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'fore I Diiie" was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and she was chosen by President Bill Clinton to recite her poem "On the Pulse of Morning" during his inauguration in 1993

 

Wallace Stegner - Stegner's novel "Angle of Repose" won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1972


1972

Wallace Stegner - He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972 and the U.S. National Book Award in 1977

 

Mike Royko - In 1972, Royko received the Pulitzer Prize for commentary as a "Daily News" man

 

Jason Patric - The play first debuted in 1972, and won, among other awards, the Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award


1973

Robert Lowell - Finally, the last work in Lowell's sonnet sequence, "The Dolphin" , which won the 1974 Pulitzer Prize, includes poems about his daughter, his ex-wife, and his new wife Caroline Blackwood whom he had affectionately nicknamed "Dolphin

 

Maya Angelou - Her honors have included a National Book *award nomination for "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," a Pulitzer Prize nomination for her book of poetry, "Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'fore I Diiie," a Tony *award nomination for her role in the 1973 play "Look Away", and three Grammys for her spoken word albums

 

Eudora Welty - Her novel "The Optimist's Daughter" won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973

 

Conrad Aiken - Honored by his native state in 1973 with the title of Poet Laureate, Aiken will always be remembered in his native state as the first Georgia-born author to win a Pulitzer Prize in 1930, for his "Selected Poems"

 

Philip Caputo - In 1973, Caputo was part of a writing team that won the Pulitzer Prize for reporting on election fraud in Chicago

 

Jason Miller (playwright) - Miller was launched into stardom in 1973 by winning a Pulitzer Prize for his play, "That Championship Season"

 

Eudora Welty - She continued to write, and won a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1973 for her novel, "The Optimist's Daughter"


1974

Soren Kierkegaard - Ernest Becker based his 1974 Pulitzer Prize book, The Denial of Death, on the writings of Kierkegaard, Freud and Otto Rank

 

John F. Reynolds - Reynolds plays a role in Michael Shaara's 1974 Pulitzer Prize winning novel "The Killer Angels", as well as the 1993 film based on that novel, "Gettysburg"


1976

John Ashbery - He has published more than twenty volumes of poetry and won nearly every major American *award for poetry, including a Pulitzer Prize in 1976 for his collection "Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror"

 

Scott Joplin - In 1976, Joplin was posthumously *awarded a Pulitzer Prize


1977

Norman Maclean - This title was nominated by a selection committee to receive the Pulitzer Prize in Letters in 1977, but the full committee ignored the nomination and did not award a Pulitzer in that category for the year

 

Alex Haley - "Roots" was eventually published in 37 languages, and Haley won a Special Award for the work in 1977 from the Pulitzer Board


1979

Alice Childress - Her 1979 novel "A Short Walk" was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize


1980

Frederick Buechner - His next work, Godric, published in 1980, was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize

 

Norman Mailer - In 1980, The Executioner's Song—Mailer's novelization of the life and death of murderer Gary Gilmore—won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.


1981

Peter Bogdanovich - Teresa Carpenter's "Death of a Playmate" article about Dorothy Stratten's murder was published in "The Village Voice" and won the 1981 Pulitzer Prize, and while Bogdanovich did not criticize Carpenter's article in his book, she had lambasted both Bogdanovich and Playboy mogul Hugh Hefner, claiming that Stratten was a victim of them as much as of her husband, Paul Snider, who killed her and himself

 

Janet Cooke - Cooke was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing on April 13, 1981


1982

Art Buchwald - He received the Pulitzer Prize for Outstanding Commentary in 1982 and in 1986 was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters

 

Tracy Kidder - His second book, "The Soul of a New Machine", was much more successful than his first, and won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-fiction in 1982

 

James Chesnut, Jr. - In 1982 a version edited by the historian C. Vann Woodward and published as "Mary Chesnut's Civil War Diary" won the Pulitzer Prize for history

 

Art Buchwald - In 1982, Buchwald's syndicated newspaper column won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary

 

Robert Mitchum - In 1982, Mitchum went on location to Scranton, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, to play Coach Delaney in the film adaptation of playwright/actor Jason Miller's 1973 Pulitzer Prize winning play That Championship Season.

 

Sylvia Plath - In 1982, she won a Pulitzer Prize posthumously, for "The Collected Poems"


1983

Winston Groom - "Conversations with the Enemy" was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1983


1984

Thomas Berger (novelist) - In 1984 his book "The Feud" was nominated by the Pulitzer committee for fiction for the Pulitzer Prize, but the Pulitzer board overrode their recommendation and instead chose William Kennedy's "Ironweed"

 

David Mamet - " He was *awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1984 for "Glengarry Glen Ross," which received its first Broadway revival in the summer of 2005

 

Thomas Berger (novelist) - "Reinhart's Women" won Berger an Ohioana Book *award, and he was a 1984 Pulitzer Prize finalist for "The Feud"


 

There have been dozens of Special Citations and awards: more than ten each in Arts, Journalism, and Letters, and five for Pulitzer Prize service, most recently to Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. in 1985 add something

 

Studs Terkel - The Good War - He received the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1985 for "The Good War", and is best remembered for his oral histories of common Americans, and for hosting a long-running radio show in Chicago

 

Anne Tyler - Her tenth novel, "The Accidental Tourist", was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1985, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1986 and was made into a 1988 movie starring William Hurt and Geena Davis


1986

Michael Connelly - He stayed with the paper for a few years and in 1986, he and two other reporters spent several months interviewing survivors of the 1985 Delta Flight 191 plane crash, a story which earned Connelly a place as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize


1987

August Wilson - In 1987, Saint Paul, Minnesota 's mayor George Latimer named May 27 "August Wilson Day." He was honored because he was the only person to both come from Minnesota and win a Pulitzer Prize

 

Oscar Wilde - Wilde's life was still waiting for independent, true scholarship when Richard Ellmann began researching his 1987 biography "Oscar Wilde", for which he posthumously won a National Book Critics Circle *award in 1988 and a Pulitzer Prize in 1989


1988

Robert Dana - His poetry collection "Starting Out for the Difficult World" was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 1988

 

John Bonham - In 1988, for example, the Pulitzer laureate Christopher Rouse composed "Bonham" in tribute to the drummer

 

Tom Shales - Shales received the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1988, for his work at "Washington Post"


1989

Anne Tyler - Her 11th novel, "Breathing Lessons", received the Pulitzer Prize in 1989


1990

Oscar Hijuelos - His second novel, "The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love", received the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

 

Nicholas D. Kristof - In 1990 Kristof and his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, earned a Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for their reporting on the pro-democracy student movement and the related Tiananmen Square protests of 1989

 

Jesse L. Martin - The 1990s update of Puccini's "La Bohème" earned six Drama Desk Awards, five Obie Awards, four Tony Awards, and the Pulitzer Prize


1991

Neil Simon - After winning the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1991 for "Lost in Yonkers", critics began to take notice of the depths, complexity and issues of universal interest in his stories, which expressed serious concerns of most average people

 

Neil Simon - In 1991 he won the Pulitzer Prize along with the Tony *award for "Lost in Yonkers"

 

Neil Simon - This attitude changed after 1991, when he won a Pulitzer Prize for drama with "Lost in Yonkers"


1992

James Tate (writer) - Tate won the 1992 Pulitzer Prize and the Poetry Society of America's William Carlos Williams Award in 1991 for his "Selected Poems"


1993

Louise Gluck - Glück won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1993 for her collection "The Wild Iris"

 

Robert Olen Butler - His short-story collection "A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain" was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1993

 

Robert Olen Butler - In 1993, his first story collection, "A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain", won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction

 

Robert Olen Butler - Robert Olen Butler is the author of 12 novels and six short story collections, including "A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain", which won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction


1995

Bruce Ducker - He received the Colorado Book Award in 1995 for "Lead Us Not Into Penn Station" and was nominated for The Pulitzer Prize for his 1994 novel "Marital Assets"


1996

Jon Robin Baitz - In 1996, he was one of the three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for his semi-autobiographical play "A Fair Country"

 

David S. Rohde - Shortly afterwards, Rohde was awarded the 1996 Pulitzer Prize "for his persistent on-site reporting of the massacre of thousands of Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica

 

David S. Rohde - While a reporter for "The Christian Science Monitor", he won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1996 for his coverage of the Srebrenica massacre

 

Herb Caen - In April 1996 Caen received a special Pulitzer Prize for "extraordinary and continuing contribution as a voice and conscience of his city"


1997

David Morse (actor) - For his performance in the 1997 Off-Broadway production of Paula Vogel's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama "How I Learned to Drive", he received an Obie *award, a Drama League *award, a Drama Desk *award, and a Lucille Lortel *award

 

Jared Diamond - "Guns, Germs, and Steel" was a best-seller and received several awards, including a Pulitzer Prize, an Aventis Prize for Science Books and the 1997 Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science


1998

Linda Greenhouse - Greenhouse was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism in 1998 "for her consistently illuminating coverage of the United States Supreme Court

 

Steven Pinker - He was twice a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, in 1998 and in 2003

 

Stephen Hunter - In 1998 Hunter won the American Society of Newspaper Editors Distinguished Writing *award in the criticism category, and in 2003 he received the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism

 

Jon Krakauer - It reached first place on "The New York Times" non-fiction bestseller list, was honored as "Book of the Year" by "Time" magazine, and was among the final three books considered for the General Non-Fiction Pulitzer Prize in 1998

 

Oba Chandler - The articles won a 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing


1999

Duke Ellington - His reputation increased after his death and the Pulitzer Prize Board bestowed on him a special posthumous honor in 1999


2000

Brian Greene - It was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in nonfiction, and winner of "The Aventis Prizes for Science Books" in 2000


2002

Jeffrey Eugenides - His 2002 novel, "Middlesex", won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2003 in addition to being a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle *award, the IMPAC Dublin Literary *award, and France's Prix Medicis


2004

Nicholas D. Kristof - Kristof was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 2004 and again in 2005 "for his powerful columns that portrayed suffering among the developing world's often forgotten people and stirred action


2005

Geraldine Brooks (writer) - The parallel novel was generally well received by the critics, resulting in its December 2005 selection by the "Washington Post" as one of the five best fiction works published during the year and, in April 2006, winning the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction


2006

Nicholas D. Kristof - In 2006 Kristof won his second Pulitzer, the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary "for his graphic, deeply reported columns that, at personal risk, focused attention on genocide in Darfur and that gave voice to the voiceless in other parts of the world


2007

Beginning in 2007, "An assortment of online elements will be permitted in all journalism categories except for the competition's two photography categories, which will continue to restrict entries to still images add something

 

Ornette Coleman - His album "Sound Grammar" received the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for music

 

Ornette Coleman - It won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for music

 

Ruth Marcus (journalist) - In March 2007, she was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in commentary


2008

David S. Rohde - He shared a second Pulitzer Prize for "Times" 2008 team coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan

 

Joshua Bell - Weingarten won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for his article on the experiment

 

In December 2008 it was announced that for the first time content published in online-only news sources would be considered add something


2009

Don Byron - Byron won the prestigious Rome Prize Fellowship awarded by the American Academy in Rome in 2009, and his Seven Etudes for solo piano, commissioned by pianist Lisa Moore made him a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Musical Composition in 2009.

 

Don Byron - Byron won the prestigious Rome Prize Fellowship awarded by the American Academy in Rome in 2009, and his Seven Etudes for solo piano, commissioned by pianist Lisa Moore made him a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Musical Composition in 2009.

 

Louise Erdrich - "The Plague of Doves" was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2009

 

David S. Rohde - In April 2009, Rohde shared in a second Pulitzer Prize, awarded to the staff of "The New York Times" for "its masterful, groundbreaking coverage of America's deepening military and political challenges in Afghanistan and Pakistan, reporting frequently done under perilous conditions

 

Louise Erdrich - In April 2009, her novel "The Plague of Doves" was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction


2010

The claim is supported by a statement from the 2010 Pulitzer Prize winner for commentary, Kathleen Parker: add something

 

Hank Williams - On April 12, 2010, the Pulitzer Prize Board *awarded Williams a posthumous special citation that paid tribute to his "craftsmanship as a songwriter who expressed universal feelings with poignant simplicity and played a pivotal role in transforming country music into a major musical and cultural force in American life


2011

David Foster Wallace - Wallace's unfinished novel, "The Pale King", was published in 2011, and in 2012 was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize

 

David Garrison - Garrison starred in Second Stage Theatre's "By The Way, Meet Vera Stark" by Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage co-starring Stephanie J. Block, and Sanaa Lathan which closed June 12, 2011


2012

For example, msnbc.com's Bill Dedman pointed out in 2012 that financial journalist Betty Liu was described as "Pulitzer Prize-Nominated" in her Bloomberg Television advertising and the jacket of her book, while "National Review" writer Jonah Goldberg made similar claims of "Pulitzer nomination" to promote his books add something

 

Forrest Gander - Gander's book "Core Samples from the World" was a finalist for 2012 Pulitzer Prize and the 2011 National Book Critics Circle Award

 

Cynthia Nixon - In 2012, Nixon stars as Professor Vivian Bearing in the Broadway debut of Margaret Edson's Pulitzer Prize winning play "Wit

 

Nicholas D. Kristof - Kristof was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize again in 2012; altogether, he has been a Pulitzer finalist six times

 

David Foster Wallace - Pulitzer Prize nomination for "The Pale King" in 2012


2015

In 2015, magazines were allowed to enter for the first time in two categories add something


2016

By 2016, this provision had expanded to three additional categories add something

 

In October 2016, magazine eligibility was extended to all journalism categories add something


2017

Hitherto confined to local coverage, the Breaking News Reporting category was expanded to encompass state and national reporting in 2017 add something

 

Definitions of Pulitzer Prize categories as presented in the December 2017 Plan of award: add something