United States Navy

Knowledge Identifier: &United_States_Navy

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United States Navy

Naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States add

Category: Military

Founded in 1907.

Countries: United States (75%), (7%), Vietnam (4%)

Main connections: World War II, World War I, United States Marine Corps

Linked to: United States Coast Guard, Royal Navy, Soviet Union, Officer Candidate School

 

Timeline


 

This timeline needs to be reviewed and corrected, as it has been automatically generated from multiple web sources.
Please help improve it by adding dated informations, images and videos about United States Navy.


1907

In 1907, most of the navy's battleships, with several support vessels, dubbed the Great White Fleet, were showcased in a 14-month circumnavigation of the world add something


1910

The U.S. Navy began to research the use of aircraft at sea in the 1910s, with Lieutenant Theodore G. "Spuds" Ellyson becoming the first naval aviator on 28 January 1911, and commissioned its first aircraft carrier, USS "Langley", in 1922 add something

 

Arthur S. Carpender - He was commissioned as an ensign in the United States Navy on 6 June 1910


1911

By 1911, the US had begun building the super-dreadnoughts at a pace to eventually become competitive with even Britain add something

 

John Rodgers (naval officer, World War I) - His early naval career included service on ships of various types before studying flying in 1911 and becoming the second American naval officer to fly for the United States Navy

 

John Rodgers (naval officer, World War I) - John Rodgers - On September 1911, Lieutenant John Rodgers flew a crated Wright Model B-1 aircraft delivered by Orville Wright at an armory in Annapolis, Maryland , Maryland, and bringing naval flight as a pioneer to the United States Navy


1916

The strength of the United States Navy grew under an ambitious ship building program associated with the Naval Act of 1916 add something


1917

During the George W. Bush administration, the fleet dropped to a total number of ships that was smaller than any time since 1917 add something

 

Hesitation by the senior command meant that naval forces were not contributed until late 1917 add something

 

George O'Brien (actor) - In 1917 O'Brien enlisted in the United States Navy to fight in World War I, serving on a Submarine chaser

 

William Boeing - When America entered the First World War in April 1917, Boeing changed the name of Pacific Aero Products Co. to Boeing_Airplane_Company and obtained orders from the United States Navy for 50 planes

 

Ralph Talbot - Talbot enlisted in the United States Navy in October 1917 with the rank of Seaman 2nd Class

 

Ronald Niel Stuart - A few months after assuming command, on 15 October 1917, Stuart was on hand to rescue the United States Navy destroyer USS "Cassin" after she was torpedoed by "U-61" in heavy weather


1918

James Allred - He was known as "Vee" until he enlisted in the United States Navy in 1918

 

Vic Aldridge - In 1918 he played only three games, pitching only twelve innings, before joining the United States Navy during the final year of World War I

 

Humphrey Bogart - With no viable career options, Bogart followed his love for the sea and enlisted in the United States Navy in the spring of 1918

 

Arthur Rose Eldred - A graduate of Cornell University, Eldred enlisted at age 22 in the United States Navy in January 1918, nine months after the U.S. entry into World War I. After serving aboard various Navy vessels and seeing combat in that conflict, he worked in the agriculture and produce transportation industries, serving as a railroad industry official

 

Arthur Rose Eldred - Eldred enlisted in the United States Navy in January 1918, during World War I. He was initially assigned to the Philadelphia Naval Yard before shipping out on the transport USS "Henderson" on Sunday, June 30, 1918 from Bush Terminal in Brooklyn, New York for overseas duty


1920

Arthur Godfrey - Godfrey served in the United States Navy from 1920 to 1924 as a radio operator on naval destroyers, but returned home to care for the family after his father's death

 

L. Ron Hubbard - He traveled in Asia and the South Pacific in the late 1920s after his father, an officer in the United States Navy, was posted to the U.S. naval base on Guam

 

Thomas Edison - The United States Navy department *awarded him the Navy Distinguished Service Medal in 1920

 

Jacob Zeilin - Two ships in the United States Navy have been named U.S."Zeilin" in his honor: in 1920 and in 1941


1927

Charles Lindbergh - Lindbergh, and on his arrival back in the United States aboard the United States Navy cruiser on June 11, 1927, a fleet of warships and multiple flights of military aircraft including pursuit planes, bombers and the rigid airship , escorted him up the Potomac River to Washington, D.C. where President Calvin Coolidge *awarded him the Distinguished Flying Cross


1929

Robert A. Heinlein - Heinlein graduated from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis in 1929, and served as an officer in the United States Navy

 

Charles R. Ware - He enlisted in the United States Navy on 14 June 1929, and in 1930 was appointed to the United States Naval Academy


1930

Bill Raisch - A dancer who worked for Ziegfeld Follies in the 1930s, he lost his right arm while serving in the United States Navy in 1945 during World War II

 

Mark Lambert Bristol - Bristol served as chairman of the General Board of the United States Navy from 1930 until 1932

 

James E. Williams - "'James Elliott Williams"' was a sailor of the United States Navy during the 1950s and 1960s


1932

A. P. Hamann - After graduating in 1932, he served as the university's alumni association director before joining the United States Navy during World War II


1936

By 1936, with the completion of the , the U.S. Navy possessed a carrier fleet of 165,000 tonnes displacement, although this figure was nominally recorded as 135,000 tonnes to comply with treaty limitations add something


1937

The U.S. Navy grew into a formidable force in the years prior to World War II, with battleship production being restarted in 1937, commencing with the add something


1938

Jack Warden - Warden worked as a nightclub bouncer, tugboat deckhand and lifeguard before joining the United States Navy in 1938


1940

Malcolm Knowles - In 1940, he assumed the position of Director of Adult Education at the Boston YMCA until he was drafted into the United States Navy in 1943

 

Thomas Edison - The United States Navy named the USS "Edison" , a Gleaves class destroyer, in his honor in 1940


1941

Though ultimately unsuccessful, Japan attempted to allay this strategic threat with the 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor add something

 

Richard Boone - He attended Stanford University in Palo Alto, California , California, but left prior to graduation and tried his hand at oil-rigging, bartending, painting and writing before joining the United States Navy in 1941

 

Benjamin F. Isherwood - In a 1941 article in the United States Naval Institute's "Proceedings", George W. Dyson stated that Isherwood might possibly be the greatest engineer the United States Navy had developed

 

John Paul Stevens - He began work on his master's degree in English at the university in 1941, but soon decided to join the United States Navy, He enlisted on December 6, 1941, one day before the attack on Pearl Harbor, and served as an intelligence officer in the Pacific Theater from 1942 to 1945

 

Duke Cunningham - "'Randall Harold Cunningham"' , usually known as "'Randy"' or "'Duke"', is a United States Navy veteran and former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from California's 50th Congressional District from 1991 to 2005


1942

Lenny Bruce - After spending time working on a farm, Bruce joined the United States Navy at the age of 16 in 1942, and saw active duty during World War II aboard the fighting in Northern Africa, Palermo , Italy in 1943 and Anzio, Italy in 1944

 

Dudley C. Sharp - He served in the United States Navy from 1942 to 1945

 

Jack Kerouac - Kerouac joined the United States Merchant Marine in 1942, and in 1943 joined the United States Navy, but he served only eight days of active duty before arriving on the sick list

 

Conrad Emil Lambert Helfrich - When a combined command was finally created in January 1942, he was bypassed for the post of commander of the navy, in favour of Admiral Thomas C. Hart of the United States Navy


1943

Ted Taylor (physicist) - From 1943 to 1946 he served on active duty in the United States Navy

 

Lowell Fulson - Fulson was drafted in 1943, but left the United States Navy in 1945

 

Leo Ryan - He received V-12 officer training at Bates College and served with the United States Navy from 1943 to 1946 as a submariner

 

Grace Hopper - In 1943, Hopper obtained a leave of absence from Vassar and was sworn in to the United States Navy Reserve, one of many women to volunteer to serve in the WAVES

 

John Lindsay - With the outbreak of World War II, Lindsay completed his studies early and in 1943 joined the United States Navy as a gunnery officer

 

Baldomero Lopez - He enlisted in the United States Navy on July 8, 1943, shortly after graduating from high school, and served until June 11 of the next year


1944

Ken Olsen - After serving in the United States Navy between 1944 and 1946, Olsen attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned an BS and an MS degrees in electrical engineering

 

Harry Babbitt - Babbitt served in the United States Navy from 1944 to 1946, returned to Kyser's band, which he eventually left for good in 1949

 

Richard Howard Ichord, Jr. - From 1944 to 1946 he served in the United States Navy

 

Gerard K. O'Neill - He graduated in 1944, during World War II, and enlisted in the United States Navy on his 17th birthday

 

Stan Musial - Musial won his second World Series ring in 1944, missed the entire 1945 season while serving with the United States Navy

 

Louis J. Carpellotti - The United States Navy destroyer escort USS "Carpellotti" was named for Private First Class Carpellotti, but her construction was cancelled in 1944 before she could be launched

 

Edward E. Gyatt - The United States Navy destroyer escort USS "Gyatt" was named for Private Gyatt, but her construction was cancalled in 1944 before she could be completed

 

Woodrow Wilson Barr - The USS Barr , a United States Navy "Buckley"-class destroyer escort commissioned in 1944, was named for Woodrow Wilson Barr

 

Eli Thomas Reich - Reich received the Navy Cross three times, the second-highest decoration for valor the United States Navy awards, after the Medal of Honor, for "extraordinary heroism" as commander of the "Sealion II" from its March 8, 1944 commissioning until relieved by Lieutenant Commander Charles F. Putnam on December 4, 1944


1945

Richard B. Anderson - In 1945, the United States Navy destroyer was named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Anderson

 

Stan Musial - Musial entered the United States Navy on January 23, 1945, and was initially assigned to noncombat duty at the Naval Training Station in Bainbridge, Maryland

 

Edward O'Hare - On January 27, 1945 the United States Navy named a in his honor

 

Edward L. Beach, Jr. - "The Navy Cross is presented to Edward Latimer Beach, Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy, for gallantry and intrepidity in action as Executive Officer, Navigator and Assistant Approach Officer on board the U.S.S. TIRANTE on the First War Patrol of that submarine during the period March 3, 1945 to April 25, 1945, in enemy controlled waters of the East China Sea. Lieutenant Commander Beach rendered valiant service to his commanding officer in penetrating mined and shoal-obstructed shallow waters in defiance of hostile shore-based radar stations and aircraft

 

Lewis K. Bausell - The Medal of Honor, posthumously awarded the Marine by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, was presented to his mother and father in the Navy Department in Washington, D.C. by Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal on June 11, 1945

 

At its peak, the U.S. Navy was operating 6,768 ships on V-J Day in August 1945 add something


1946

Johnny Vaught - After serving in World War II as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy, he took a job as an assistant coach at Ole Miss in 1946, and was named head coach a year later

 

Yudell Luke - Luke served in the United States Navy until 1946; he was stationed in Hawaii for the duration of the war

 

Cyrus Vance - Vance served in the United States Navy as a gunnery officer on the destroyer USS "Hale" until 1946, and joined the law firm Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in New York City , before entering government services

 

Ross F. Gray - The coveted award was presented to the hero's father by Rear Admiral A. S. Merrill, United States Navy, Commandant of the Eighth Naval District, at the football field at Centerville High School in the presence of the Governor of the State of Alabama, Chauncey Sparks, on April 16, 1946


1947

The United States First Fleet existed after the Second World War from 1947, but it was redesignated Third Fleet in early 1973 add something

 

Julius La Rosa - In 1947, at age 17, he joined the United States Navy after finishing high school, becoming a radioman

 

James E. Williams - In July 1947, at the age of 16, he entered the United States Navy where he served for twenty years, retiring in April 1967


1948

Teo Macero - After serving in the United States Navy, he moved to New York City in 1948 to attend the Juilliard School of Music

 

James Abourezk - Between 1948 and 1952, Abourezk served in the United States Navy during the Korean War


1949

Scott Carpenter - Korean War - On the eve of the Korean War, Carpenter was recruited by the United States Navy's Direct Procurement Program , and reported to Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida in the fall of 1949 for pre-flight and primary flight training

 

Michael E. Thornton - Born on March 23, 1949, in Greenville, South Carolina, South Carolina, Thornton graduated from high school in 1967 and enlisted in the United States Navy later that year in Spartanburg, South Carolina


1950

Frank E. Petersen - Petersen enlisted in the United States Navy in 1950 as a Seaman Apprentice

 

Jonah Edward Kelley - When the ship was transferred to the United States Navy in 1950, it became the


1954

Gene Littler - He served in the United States Navy before turning pro in the spring of 1954


1955

Robert Coover - He attended Southern Illinois University Carbondale, received his B.A. in Slavic Studies from Indiana University in 1955, served in the United States Navy


1956

Frederick Moosbrugger - He was transferred to the Retired List of the United States Navy on 1 October 1956, and was advanced to the rank of vice admiral

 

Joe Hooper (Medal of Honor) - Hooper enlisted in the United States Navy in December 1956


1958

Richard Marcinko - After attending Admiral Farragut Academy in Toms River, New Jersey, Marcinko enlisted in the United States Navy in 1958 as a radioman

 

John McCain - McCain followed his father and grandfather, both four-star admirals, into the United States Navy, graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1958

 

Josiah Willard Gibbs - The United States Navy oceanographic research ship USNS " Josiah Willard Gibbs" , in service from 1958 to 1971, was named for Gibbs


1959

Peter Boyle - After graduating from Officer Candidate School in 1959, he was commissioned as an ensign in the United States Navy, but his military career was shortened by a nervous breakdown

 

Larry McDonald - From 1959 to 1961, he served as a flight surgeon in the United States Navy stationed at the KeflavĂ­k naval base in Iceland

 

Richard Gautier - Gautier started his career as a night-club comic and a singer for dance orchestras; he joined ASCAP in 1959 after serving in the United States Navy


1960

Larry Flynt - After living on his savings for two months, he enlisted in the United States Navy in July 1960


1961

Hugh Thompson, Jr. - After dropping out of Troy State University, he volunteered for the United States Navy in 1961 and served with a Seabee construction unit from 1961 to 1964


1963

George Thomas Coker - He entered the United States Navy Reserve on October 31, 1963 and served until November 12, 1963


1964

Stonewall Jackson - The United States Navy submarine U.S.S. "Stonewall Jackson" , commissioned in 1964, was named for him


1966

Two examples are the 1966 Palomares B-52 crash incident and search for the nuclear bombs, and the Task Force 71 of the Seventh Fleet operation in search for Korean Air Lines Flight 007 shot down by the Soviets on 1 Sep 1983 add something

 

Bob Kerrey - Vietnam War - Kerrey served in the United States Navy as a SEAL from 1966 to 1969 during the Vietnam War

 

Bill Cowan - Cowan enlisted in the United States Navy at the age of 17, received an appointment to and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1966, and was commissioned as a lieutenant the United States Marine Corps

 

Kenneth Anger - Of this film, Anger would later state in 1966 that "This flick is all I have to say about being 17, the United States Navy, American Christmas and the fourth of July


1967

Duke Cunningham - Cunningham joined the United States Navy in 1967


1968

Drew Edmondson - From 1968 to 1972, he served in the United States Navy including a year of duty in Vietnam


1969

Bill McCollum - McCollum's professional career began in 1969 with the United States Navy's Judge Advocate General Corps where he served on active duty until 1972


1975

Alan Bean - After retiring from the United States Navy in 1975 and NASA in 1981, Bean pursued his interest in painting, depicting various space-related scenes and documenting his own experiences in space as well as that of his fellow Apollo Program astronauts

 

Anthony Principi - Principi earned his Juris Doctor degree from Seton Hall in 1975 and was assigned to the United States Navy's Judge Advocate General Corps in San Diego


1976

Alan Hale (astronomer) - He served in the United States Navy from 1976 to 1983, graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1980


1978

Charlie Murphy - Charlie enlisted in the United States Navy in 1978 and served for 6 years as a Boiler Technician


1980

Land strikes are the domain of the BGM-109 Tomahawk, which was first deployed in the 1980s and is continually being updated to increase its capabilities add something

 

Medium-long range defense is provided by the Standard Missile 2, which has been deployed since the 1980s add something


1981

Scott Altman - Commissioned as an Ensign in the United States Navy in August 1981, and received his Naval Aviator wings in February 1983


1984

Rick James - Following his exit from the United States Navy in 1984, Murphy's older brother Charlie Murphy, whose first post-Navy job was working as security for his famous brother, began hanging out with James, bonding with the singer


1985

Monica Dickens - Soon after this, she moved from her home in Hinxworth in Hertfordshire to the United States after marrying a United States Navy officer, Roy O. Stratton, who died in 1985

 

David Lange - The policy, developing in 1985, had the effect of prohibiting United States Navy ships from visiting New Zealand


1987

The United States Navy conducted various combat operations in the Persian Gulf against Iran in 1987 and 1988, most notably Operation Praying Mantis add something

 

Laurel Clark - During medical school she did active duty training with the Diving Medicine Department at the United States Navy Experimental Diving Unit in March 1987


1991

William C. Rogers III - He retired from the United States Navy in August 1991


1995

Its naval air station was deactivated in 1995 and its flight activities transferred to nearby Andersen Air Force Base add something


1996

Darrell S. Cole - In 1996 the United States Navy named the , a destroyer, in his honor

 

Alfredo Cantu Gonzalez - The United States Navy guided missile destroyer , commissioned in 1996, is named in his honor

 

Matthew Henson - In October 1996, the United States Navy commissioned USNS "Henson", a "Pathfinder" class Oceanographic Survey Ship, in honor of Matthew Henson


2001

Amphibious transport docks are named for cities, except for , named for Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado, and three "San Antonio" class ships named in memory of the September 11, 2001 attacks add something

 

Many ships chose to shift colors later that year on the first anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks add something


2004

Puerto Rico in the Caribbean formerly housed Roosevelt Roads Naval Station, which was shut down in 2004 shortly after the controversial closure of the live ordnance training area on nearby Vieques Island add something


2007

In 2007, the U.S. Navy joined with the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard to adopt a new maritime strategy called A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower that raises the notion of prevention of war to the same philosophical level as the conduct of war add something

 

Accessed 19 May 2007 Non-commissioned, civilian-manned vessels of the navy have names that begin with "USNS", standing for "United States Naval Ship" The names of ships are officially selected by the secretary of the navy, often to honor important people or places add something

 

The strategy was presented by the Chief of Naval Operations, the Commandant of the Marine Corps and Commandant of the Coast Guard at the International Sea Power Symposium in Newport, R.I. on 17 October 2007 add something


2008

In early 2008, the navy reactivated the United States Fourth Fleet to control operations in the area controlled by Southern Command, which consists of US assets in and around Central and South America add something


2009

George H. W. Bush - On January 10, 2009, both George H.W. and George W. Bush were present at the commissioning of the , the tenth and last supercarrier of the United States Navy


2010

In 2010, Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Gary Roughead noted that demands on the Navy have grown as the fleet has shrunk and that in the face of declining budgets in the future, the US Navy must rely even more on international partnerships add something


2011

As of 2011, the navy operates 285 ships, 3,700 aircraft, 50,000 non-combat vehicles and owns 75,200 buildings on add something

 

Among the commands of the shore establishment, as of April 2011, are the Naval Education and Training Command, the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, the Naval Supply Systems Command, the Naval Air Systems Command, the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, the Bureau of Naval Personnel, the United States Naval Academy, the Naval Safety Center, the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center, and the United States Naval Observatory add something


2012

The F-35 Lightning II is presently under development and was scheduled to replace the C and D versions of the Hornet beginning in 2012 add something

 

The navy had established a minimum requirement for 11 aircraft carriers, but dropped to 10 when the "Enterprise" retired in December 2012, before the "Gerald R. Ford" enters service add something


2013

In its 2013 budget request, the navy has focused on retaining all eleven big deck carriers, at the expense of cutting numbers of smaller ships and delaying the SSBN replacement add something


2014

In March 2014, the Navy is considering counting deployable ships such as minesweepers, patrol craft, and hospital ships in the battlefleet add something


2015

The LCS program is still relatively new as of 2015 with only a few active ships, but the navy has announced plans for up to 32 ships add something


2016

The Navy's most recent 30-year shipbuilding plan, published in 2016, calls for a future fleet of 308 ships in order to meet the challenges of an increasingly competitive international environment add something


2018

The LCS program is still relatively new as of 2018 with only ten active ships, but the navy has announced plans for up to 32 ships add something


2019

Initial operational capability of the F-35C is now expected to be February 2019 add something

 

U.S. Navy ships and craft will return to flying the "Union Jack", a small blue flag emblazoned with the stars of the 50 states, effective June 4, 2019 add something